EUROPE LOOKS AT THE CIVIL WAR by

EUROPE LOOKS AT THE CIVIL WAR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

So many books on so many aspects of the Civil War have appeared that it is very nice to encounter one that has a different approach. The editors here have made use of all kinds of sources -- newspapers, magazines, letters, diplomatic papers, official documents, speeches, pamphlets (but nothing later than 1865) -- and all kinds of people (with all sorts of opinions) and nationalities to produce a panorama of European feeling about the Civil War. The material is framed in two deaths -- John Brown's and Lincoln's -- and the excerpts reflect the intensely personal response to the ""greatest event of the century"" in many fields --religious, social, political, material, economic, etc. It has several fascinating inclusions -- Queen Victoria's letter of condolence to Mrs. Lincoln, the correspondence with Garibaldi concerning the possibility of a command in the Union Armies, Ibsen's poem The Assassination of Abraham Linccln and much more -- and the comments -- from Russia, Spain, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Belgium, (the Republic of San Marino confers citizenship on President Lincoln), and from royalty as well as working men -- in their contrasts, in their attitudes, in their approach (from calm to inflamed) offer a kaleidoscope that has its changes through the years. Arranged chronologically, omitting the military (battles and strategy), this should be a diverting companion piece to the current Civil War library.

Publisher: Orion