A VALENTINE FOR VINNIE by Marjory Hall

A VALENTINE FOR VINNIE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Vinnie Trent, at loose ends because she can't go away to secretarial school, takes a job in a gift shop to have something to do. She finds to her surprise that she has a knack for display and buying, and talks her sweet-but-old-fashioned employer into changes that, in the course of a year, boost business to booming. Vinnie's successes give her a new perspective on herself, enabling her to like herself better, to see the folly of her infatuation with the big-man-in-high-school, to take an interest in other people, and to discover the real qualitites in steady old Hal Loomis. It is commendable for an author to attempt a non-vivacious, atypical teenager--a type rarely admitted in girls' stories--but Vinnie is perhaps too average to be interesting. Characters are presented from Vinnie's point-of-view, and, as she is a poor judge of character, the resulting tone is flat and weak. A revealing conversation between Vinnie and Hal at the end shows definite signs of life, but unfortunately not sufficient to save a dull story.

Pub Date: April 26th, 1965
Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls