SARALEE'S SILVER SPOON by Marjory Hall

SARALEE'S SILVER SPOON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is not just another career novel, but, like Saralee herself ""something special"". With a vocation-cum-career angle (making headway in a big manufacturing concern, specifically the manufacturing of flat silverware), Marjory Hall makes her characters, the main ones, more than two dimensional. There are insecurities, frustrations, aspirations -- even their smallnesses -- which do live. Saralee herself, coming home to a small Maine town after failing to get her second year scholarship at the Art Institute, has a full set of piques and disappointments and bitternesses, so much that she fails momentarily to realize the welcome that awaits her, the sacrifices her grandmother and aunt have made gladly for her, the opportunity that is here to carry and share. She tumbles to the situation in several rather painful installments, and bit by bit finds new ways of satisfaction in her new life. Some of the minor characters, too, live in these pages, and the author carefully avoids making all the pieces fall into place.

Pub Date: April 22nd, 1952
Publisher: Wm. Sloane