RODALE'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NATURAL HOME REMEDIES by Mark Bricklin

RODALE'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NATURAL HOME REMEDIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Alphabetically, from acne to yeast infections: real grandma-type remedies--many presented in the form of letters from Rodale readers. As Bricklin is careful to point out, ""the remedies described here are neither advice nor prescriptions, but ideas."" They include practical suggestions (arthritis sufferers may find that sleeping in a sleeping bag prevents morning stiffness); herbalist remedies (jimsonweed poultices for burns and bruises); and recommendations for vitamin supplementation (toned down from earlier Rodale days). A brief section on first aid departs from folk-based natural remedies and instead describes currently-accepted medical procedure. Also special is an extended section on the history and practice of folk medicine--which cheerfully admits that the ritual of preparing and administering traditional remedies has a therapeutic function. Taken in its place, this offers much comfort--and not a little entertainment.

Pub Date: Oct. 4th, 1982
Publisher: Rodale