THE OLD WOMAN AND THE PEDLAR by Mark Taylor

THE OLD WOMAN AND THE PEDLAR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Mother Goose rhyme of the old woman who ""fell asleep on the King's highway,"" whereupon ""Along came a pedlar whose name was Stout,/ (who) cut her petticoats round about,"" is expanded into the story of Mulberry Meg, purveyor of prime tarts, cheeses and wine. Prosperous and content, she declines the suit of Pedlar Stout until, to convince her that she needs a good husband, he exposes her to the disdain of the populace, even to the hostility of her dog, by cutting her skirts. There's some tee-heeing about getting ""tiddly"" and somewhat excessive (and unfair?) fun at the expense of poor Meg, who does of look a fright when shifty Stout gets through with her. The drawings, in a style reminiscent of Anita Lobel's, are uneven and never up to the standard of The Bold Fisherman. Neither, by a long shot, is the book--which may amuse or annoy depending on how you look at it.

Pub Date: April 14th, 1969
Publisher: Golden Gate