I LIKE TO PLAY

A flawed look at the ways children play around the world. Many children in the United States or Canada may no longer make their own toys, but the photos of kids from Bangladesh, Malawi and Sudan who have created their own playthings from bits of wood and wire or even old radios are intriguing. The photos of children dancing in Peru and Myanmar, building with plastic blocks in Indonesia and Vietnam and playing with balls in Ethiopia and Mongolia (activities a little more familiar to most North American readers) can also work as conversation starters. Unfortunately, this book in the World Vision Early Readers series suffers from a lack of specific identification (readers have to go to the photo credits to find out where the pictures were taken), no map and a text that provides little new information. While the emphasis on the universal is understandable, maps and country names can and should become part of every child’s early learning, and it’s precisely these visual books that could help make children aware of the world outside their little neighborhood. Look for others that do the job better. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: April 13, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-88776-998-6

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Tundra

Review Posted Online: Dec. 29, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2010

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Readers who’ve never been to Mumbai will want to visit while those who love it will smile.

THE MOUNTAINS OF MUMBAI

An ode to urbanism and a love letter to India’s largest city.

When Doma, from Ladakh, a special administrative region in the disputed territory of Kashmir, visits her friend Veda in Mumbai, she misses the mountains of her home. “Tell me something,” asks Veda. “Do the mountains have to be exactly like the ones in Ladakh? Big, brown triangles?” Doma is incredulous; how else would a mountain look? Veda takes her friend by the hand and leads her on a tour of the megalopolis featuring views of both rooftops and a city street from above. Veda takes Doma up a seemingly endless spiral staircase and onto a terrace, from which the pair looks out on Marine Drive, a promenade and beach abutting the Arabian Sea. “Yes! Yes! Yes! We are on top of a mountain in Mumbai,” Doma cheers. Jain’s watercolor paintings are vivid and detailed, reveling in the bustle of the city. The unusual trim—double-page spreads measure 7 inches high by 28 inches wide—gives a sense of sweeping panoramas. One particularly effective spread demands a 90-degree turn of the book to fully appreciate the staircase the girls ascend. Veda and Doma’s journey is punctuated with recognizable landmarks (e.g., the Bandra-Worli Sea Link bridge), making this an excellent book for the armchair traveler as well.

Readers who’ve never been to Mumbai will want to visit while those who love it will smile. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-81-936542-9-3

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Karadi Tales

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2020

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
  • SPONSORED PLACEMENT

One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

AFTER ALL I'VE DONE

A middle-aged woman sidelined by a horrific accident finds even sharper pains waiting on the other side of her recuperation in this expert nightmare by Hardy, familiar to many readers as Megan Hart, author of All the Secrets We Keep (2017), etc.

Five months ago, while she was on her way to the hospital with an ailing gallbladder, Diana Sparrow’s car hit a deer on a rural Pennsylvania road. When she awoke, she was minus her gallbladder, two working collarbones (and therefore two functioning arms), and her memory. During a recovery that would’ve been impossible without the constant ministrations of Harriett Richmond, the mother-in-law who’s the real reason Diana married her husband, Jonathan, Diana’s discovered that Jonathan has been cheating on her with her childhood friend Valerie Delagatti. Divorce is out of the question: Diana’s grown used to the pampered lifestyle the prenup she’d signed would snatch away from her. Every day is filled with torments. She slips and falls in a pool of wine on her kitchen floor she’s sure she didn’t spill herself. At the emergency room, her credit card and debit card are declined. She feels that she hates oppressively solicitous Harriett but has no idea why. Her sessions with her psychiatrist fail to heal her rage at her adoptive mother, an addict who abandoned her then returned only to disappear again and die an ugly death. Even worse, her attempts to recover her lost memory lead to an excruciatingly paced series of revelations. Val says Diana asked her to seduce Jonathan. Diana realizes that Cole, a fellow student in her watercolor class, isn’t the stranger she’d thought he was. Where can this maze of deceptions possibly end?

One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-64385-470-0

Page Count: 310

Publisher: Crooked Lane

Review Posted Online: Aug. 19, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

GRAND

This celebration of the grandparent-grandchild relationship from the World Vision Easy Readers series shows kids playing, working and laughing with their older relatives. The photos from countries including the Dominican Republic, Afghanistan, Armenia and Tanzania are engaging and contemporary and often show the children’s environment, homes and animals, but the names of the countries they live in are hidden away on the verso of the title page, and there is no map. Even most adults sharing this book with children will feel the lack of this information as they try to help kids identify similarities and differences in the everyday experiences of the children pictured or between readers and the children in the book. The very simple text is often trite, providing another reason to skip this well-intentioned but flawed volume. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: April 13, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-88776-997-9

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Tundra

Review Posted Online: Dec. 31, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2010

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more