EDMOND WENT FAR AWAY by Martin Bax

EDMOND WENT FAR AWAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Edmond is a solitary little English boy who lives on a farm, where the farm animals are his friends. The farthest he has been from home (except in the car--""which didn't count"") is the grove of trees across the meadow. One day he decides to go ""far away,"" and sets off to climb the hill beyond the grove. It's so far that he begins to imagine his animal friends accompanying and helping him; but when he reaches the summit, it's his father whom he sees coming, to join him in a camp out by the pond on the other side of the hill. This rather long, quiet story achieves a comforting balance between the rewards of expanding boundaries and keeping in touch with the safe security of home. It's not clear how Dad happens to be so well equipped when he follows the wanderer, but the overnight stay makes a nice extension to the journey. Foreman, at his most evocative yet, paints an idyllic farmstead, safe among the lovely, encircling hills. A special book for thoughtful preschoolers and contemplative young readers.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1989
Page count: 48pp
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich