THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN by Martin Buber

THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

These essays in Buber's Philosophical Anthropology open, in the editor's judgment, a new vein of the famous Jewish philosopher and mystic's thought. An introductory essay by the editor places Buber's view of man in the context of his philosophy of dialogue, as given in his I-Thou, and Between Man and Man. Buber defines philosophical anthropology as the problem of finding the human in the constant flow of individuals and cultures. The first essay, ""Distance and Relations,"" presents his basic theoretical position, and the second, ""Elements in the Interhuman,"" his practical elaboration. Subsequent chapters deal with, ""What Is Common to All,"" ""The Word That Is Spoken,"" ""Guilt and Guilt-Feelings,"" and ""Man and His Image-Work."" The implications for psychiatry of Buber's thought are evident at many points, and an appendix reports a dialogue between Buber and Carl Rogers. In which affinities and differences in their works are explored. A valuable addition to the available library of this great thinker's work.

Pub Date: Jan. 1st, 1965
Publisher: Harper & Row