A straightforward look at the science of aging and its effect on our bodies and minds.

READ REVIEW

Aging, Health Care, and You!

A DOCTOR'S PERSONAL PRESCRIPTION FOR UNDERSTANDING AND IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH CARE

A practical, accessible guide to the ins and outs of getting old.

Aging is perhaps humanity’s greatest unifier. Most people agree that we’re lucky if we’re able to live a long time, but the idea scares us nonetheless. In this debut, Finkelstein, a board-certified internist and geriatrician, opens with a frank, avuncular discussion of our collective fear: “There is only one alternative to aging,” he points out, “and that one is usually not the acceptable choice.” Despite this jocular beginning, the book is a serious, informative guide, and Finkelstein proves to be a sensitive, smart narrator. The first of the book’s three sections is dedicated to the science of aging, and it presents theories about why and how fast we age in a simple but rarely simplistic manner. It offers intriguing facts about why we shrink as we get older (drying cartilage) and why it becomes harder for us to breathe (stiffening chest walls). However, the book also encourages readers to think about larger issues, such as how to assess our priorities as we age. Medical professionals can’t treat an older person the way they do a 20-year-old; their age, in other words, is relevant to their treatment. This may seem obvious at first, but as the book expounds on the vast range of ailments and afflictions affecting the elderly, the point’s relevance becomes clearer. At times, this section can feel overly broad, as it covers everything from cancer to sciatica to constipation, but it may be useful to older readers looking for a general guidebook to their health issues. Indeed, readers may be grateful to know what a doctor really thinks. Other sections on health insurance and family members are similarly illuminating. Overall, the tone is accessible and the message is positive: The point of life is to enjoy it, at any age.

A straightforward look at the science of aging and its effect on our bodies and minds.

Pub Date: July 18, 2012

ISBN: 978-1470061944

Page Count: 282

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: Feb. 18, 2014

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

Did you like this book?

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more