YOU, ME AND THE ANIMAL WORLD by Martin Wells
Kirkus Star

YOU, ME AND THE ANIMAL WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Wit and the subjects in science don't often go together in print. Dr. Wells' essays prove that they are perfectly compatible -- in fact he's produced the perfect marriage here. His short essays raise basic questions, some of which are the eternally unanswerable, always discussable, points in biology: the balance of hostile environments for all animals; animal learning; evolutionary physical change as ""design development"" the balance of advantages between sexual and asexual reproduction. The particularly engaging feature of this book is that the author quotes as easily from Thurber and White as his duller colleagues do from their brother scientists. The iconoclastic irreverence of his suggestion, for instance, that dogs are undesirable pets and his reasons for why the toy breeds are abominations should provide a refreshing change from the man's-best-friend dogma. A beautiful piece of book bait for biology students. Illustrated with the author's line drawings.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1964
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin