WHAT ARE LITTLE GIRLS MADE OF? by Martin Yoseloff

WHAT ARE LITTLE GIRLS MADE OF?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Karen Hodges marries high-school beau Roser Huitt right out of college; goodbye Iowa, hello New York, where Roger's in a hurry to make the boardroom at Telkin-Rand Appliance Inc. Karen does nice wifey things like shop and dean, have a bambino, and do some personal counseling at a neighborhood welfare center. Out of the ordinary is Hector Ortiz, a young Puerto Rican law student she sleeps with once, then is so guilty about that she welcomes leaving the city for suburbia. But possibilities, missed chances--and Hector--continue to haunt her. Enter Women's Lib. Why can't she write a book about her counseling experiences--she's going to be 38, and what has she done with her life? Roger Jr., a sensitive, artistic kid, seems to sympathize with her frustrations. And meeting up with Hector again after many years doesn't do much to wet down the tinder. She ups and leaves hubby Roger, packs herself and Roger Jr. into the station wagon, rides off into the sunset toward Boston, toward a new and independent life. Yoseloff treats his low-key material in a conscientious, terribly sincere manner that seems to dye every one of its clichÉs into prominence. Decent and modest, but awfully dull.

Pub Date: Nov. 30th, 1978
Publisher: Barnes