THE IMAGE OF KATE by Mary Astor

THE IMAGE OF KATE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Miss Astor's concern here, as it was in her last venture The Incredible Charlie Car, is with the devolution of the psychotic personality. Kate Martin's mother dies as result of her laughter's birth and Kate somehow feels responsible. She is brought up, on a reach in California, by her father, two older brothers, and a sister-in-law. From a spoiled, rebellious, eminently wilful child she grows into a tall, spoiled, rebellious eminently woman, harboring all the while this same feeling of guilt. Kate is sent to the best schools, picks up her 'g's, grows away from her family, and cracks the big city with her fashion designs. Twenty years of growth and marriage to an understanding man do not assuage her guilt. Progressively more withdrawn as time goes on, she up and shoots her best friend because she feels the need to be punished. If there be somewhat of a familiar ring and something of a soapsy impression rendered by the summation, it can best to attributed to a faithfulness in the telling. It's a pity that Miss Astor shackles herself with such hackneyed plots and sub-plots, for an occasional, stunning scene reveals a very good talent. Although her dialogue is exceedingly inept, the narrative is good and the insight is there. In any case, her name should sell books.

Pub Date: March 23rd, 1962
Publisher: Doubleday