HAH-NEE OF THE CLIFF DWELLERS by Mary & Conrad Buff

HAH-NEE OF THE CLIFF DWELLERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From the Buffs comes another story and a set of pictures which together have the dignity and quiet beauty of the people they portray, a lonely family among the cliff dwelling Indians of the southwest in the days before they vanished as a tribe. During Hah-nee's youth the droughts that caused their disappearance had already begun to bring enmity among clans and between people. Hah-nee whose only real friend is Wupa, an aged wise man, is teased by the other boys as an outcast and finally learns that he was found as an abandoned Ute baby by his present parents. Fearing that Hah-nee may be picked upon as a cause of the drought, Wupa tells him of friends to the south and gives Hah-nee a map and a souvenir that see him and his family safe as members of a happy, friendlier tribe. As an interpretation of a probable happening this has sincerity and credibility.

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin