AN END TO PATIENCE by Mary Durant

AN END TO PATIENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Not as saucy as her first novel, Quartet (1963), this is a more settled entertainment and follows conventional lines converging around a summer production of Patience in a small New England town. The director and the members of the cast are all introduced at some length: Karl Getsinger, one of those that can't, teaching in a boy's school; Leslie Bentley who wants to kill her husband, Hoyt, and Hoyt, brooding over his bourbon; De Witt Preston, not writing as he planned to do, but philandering with any available piece; Fanette, recently widowed and alone with her wildflower garden; Lavender, a mindless high school girl; etc. etc. The story itself, burdened as it is with all this exposition, is somewhat logy but there are some good scenes (Leslie with her psychiatrist; Karl given a personnel-personality screening for a job; and so on) and it is all plausible. Welterweight women's fiction for just that market.

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World