THE FISHING FLEETS OF NEW ENGLAND by Mary Ellen Chase
Kirkus Star

THE FISHING FLEETS OF NEW ENGLAND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A hero of the sea and the savory tales that grew out of life on the New England coast are the subjects of Miss Chase's previous books Donald McKay and The Clipper Ships (1959, J-303) and Sailing the Seven Seas (1958, J-221). With the same spirit and knowledge that distinguished these two, she now turns her attention to a factual historical account of New England's most loved industry. The fishing fleets of New England began with controversial John Smith and grew as isolated fishing areas cropped up along the coast in the 17th and 18th centuries. What was this fleet like with its picturesque array of ketches, chebacco boats, pinkies, schooners and dories? The author describes these vessels and methods of fishing, the dangers of weather, icebergs, and disease. Particularly fascinating are the descriptions of trawling, and the factors which influenced each period of growth and decline in the industry as a whole. How it fares today winds up a precise, uncluttered account which is admirably illustrated with photographs and diagrams.

Pub Date: Nov. 9th, 1961
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin-North Star