IT'S DIFFERENT FOR A WOMAN by Mary Jane Ward

IT'S DIFFERENT FOR A WOMAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Middlewest suburbia, and the imperturbable pattern of accepted functions and conventions as a frame for the diologues between the Carters, their family, and their friends, which have a certain verbatim intimacy but are no more lively than the remarks which cross your breakfast table. Sally Carter, in her mid forties and the mother of three, deliberates over the hysterectomy her best friend advises, but settles for a simpler prescription which still does not eliminate the problem of the indeterminate years; the visit of May Johnson, to whom her husband- George- had once been engaged, revives her past as well as his and poses the possibility of present susceptibility; she broodhens over Tess, her daughter, and her engagement to a young doctor; and there's George's family, and hers, to complete a casual, candid portrait... The loose ends of lives you may recognize in terms of trivia, and the commonplaces of household interchange provides a familiarity which in this case breeds no more than tedium.

Pub Date: Nov. 7th, 1952
Publisher: Random House