THE GIRL WHO WAS NEVER QUEEN by Mary Main

THE GIRL WHO WAS NEVER QUEEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An interpreted, personalized history of Charlotte, the daughter of the prince regent (whose bizarre life, fashion, and loves stamped an era), heavily accents the vaporings, trepidations and womanly behavior that were a part of the early 19th century. Born of a mother who was rejected by her father, Charlotte was early cognizant of her position as heriess to the throne and the many dangers -- from her parents -- Caroline and her scandalous affairs, George and his mistresses; from her grandmother, the reigning queen; and from the political areas of Whigs and Tories who hovered over every minute of her life. Through Caroline's connivings that brought Charles Hesse into Charlotte's life, through her refusal to acknowledge a marriage offer from Holland, her infatuation with Frederick, her loyalty to Mercer Elphinstone for all the comfort and support this young lady never withheld, and her final decision that, with all her royal inheritance, it was only Leopold she would consider,- Charlotte -- despite a father she could never trust and a mother who made a mock of being the Princess of Wales -- did achieve the marriage she wanted. And died -- with her baby -- in childbirth, a young, nationally adored personage and wife, who never did fulfill the destiny that might have been hers. Pages of history turned slowly offer a second look at a young, likable, sometimes confused, girl -- with warm affection.

Pub Date: Aug. 3rd, 1962
Publisher: Doubleday