LAW AND THE NEW WOMAN by Mary McHugh

LAW AND THE NEW WOMAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Despite the unfortunate designation, Choosing Life-Styles, this series promises some of the most practical career guidance around. McHugh bases her handbook on interviews with practicing women lawyers and so avoids the glittering promises and idealized job descriptions so frequently offered. Imagine admitting that trusts and estate work (still commonly assigned to women) do require the capacity to tolerate boredom; that opportunities to specialize in civil rights and public interest law may be limited to volunteer positions; that paralegal work is considered a dead end by many who have gone through the training; that students who are ""a bit compulsive"" may be best suited to law school. Of course most of the women McHugh talked with are enthusiastic about their law careers and quite optimistic about expanding opportunities for women, even in such all-male bastions as politics and law school teaching. McHugh slides over the possibility that the profession (and not just the law schools) may well be overcrowded by the time her readers are ready to practice. But she does give some basis for deciding whether the lawyerly ""life-style"" is for you.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1975
Page count: 128pp
Publisher: Franklin Watts