FLYING MARY O'CONNOR by Mary O'Connor

FLYING MARY O'CONNOR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mary O'Connor, the Florence Nightingale of airline stewardesses, has written an autobiography of her work which began in 1931. In the early days of flying, stewardesses learned their job as they flew. Mary tells of her mistakes as a novice such as the time she announced the wrong stop, and then had to scurry around the airport retrieving her misguided passengers, as well as the more serious problems she encountered. She traces the changes in aircraft, airline service, stewardess training and uniforms from 1936 to 1960 in terms of her own experience. With her assertion that ""every plane in the air is a cross-section in miniature of all humanity"", Mary describes her varied experiences with people. Her bright personality and optimism is revealed if only through the amusing and humorous incidents memory has left with her. She was lauded for her war work as head of the Navy School of Air Evacuation, and after the war United Airlines named a mainliner in her honor. The book concludes with a chapter devoted to future airline stewardesses. Retrospect definitely shades this story with rosy bues but the warmth, dedication and humor that come through make it worthwhile reading.

Pub Date: March 20th, 1961
Publisher: Rand McNally