CONTRIBUTIONS OF WOMEN: EDUCATION by Mary W. Burgess

CONTRIBUTIONS OF WOMEN: EDUCATION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Staged childhood conversations, lifelessly fictionalized encounters, adulatory quotations and a steady barrage of cliches characterize this shallow collective biography of six American woman educators. The featured pioneers are Emma Hart Willard who in 1821 founded the Troy Female Seminary so that gifts could study the subjects customarily reserved for boys . . . Mary Lyon who founded Mount Holyoke, the first women's college . . . Martha Berry who started an Industrial School for Appalachian boys and later one for gifts . . . Patty Smith Hill who studied with Dewey and liberated kindergarten teaching . . . Florence Sabin who taught at Johns Hopkins medical school . . . and Mary McLeod Bethune who extended educational opportunities for black children. As pictured here, all dismally uninspiring.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1975
Page count: 143pp
Publisher: Dillon