THE MIDDLE MIST by Mary

THE MIDDLE MIST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A novel of elusive relationships, of psychological motivation and sensory reaction, which reveals once again a talent of considerable interest and ability. Writing with analytical delicacy, with a sharpness edged by satire, her end results are however confused by lapses late extremes, exaggeration. The story opens as Elsie Lane, an awward , made miserable by the quarreling of her parents, decides to run away to find her elder sister, Lee by Peter, a young doctor who enjoys advising his women patients, Elsia finds Lee, living on a houseboat with Helen, a nurse. From then on the story involves the complex attractions Lee holds for Peter (anxious to experiment with all woman); for Helen, (and the Lesbian relationship is inferred); and for Joe, a writer, who forces her to get past the block of an early, unhappy sexual relationship. Elsie, needless to say, is lost in this milieu and returns to insignificance at home. For the more discriminating reader.

Publisher: Morrow