PRIVATE PRACTICE by Matthew Benn

PRIVATE PRACTICE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

For the audience swabbed weekly by at least two serials, Benn's contained novel of small-town doctoring will tell you more about the realities of general medicine than you would ever know from all those concerned vigils on the tube. Mark Lucas inherits a country house -- he's a city-trained doctor who's not only resented but even refused admission at the local hospital where a surgeon Carling fills the beds with patients who should have been sent home to begin with. So for Lucas there's not much to do -- a highway accident or house calls for another man or fees to be split (which he refuses). Reese, the local OB who hates doing pelvics, offers him his scut work. But at the end when Carling butchers a job on the daughter of one of Lucas' few friends in town he revises his thinking about his future. . . . Lucas is not the usual sawdust sawbones -- he's alert and bright and forthcoming and so is this novel re the practices of private practice.

Pub Date: Feb. 28th, 1974
Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan