THE RAVEN AND THE SWORD by Matthew Gant

THE RAVEN AND THE SWORD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Announced as a ""biographical novel"" and written under pseudonym, this book is purportedly a fictional account of the early life of Sam Houston, ""The Raven"" to his Cherokee Indian friends, from 1810, when he was 17, to his departure in disgrace from Washington for fame and Texas at the age of 39. Readers able to grapple with the author's purple prose will learn of Houston's life with the Cherokees in Tennessee, his dealings with Andrew Jackson and his election to Congress, his drunken violences and his many, many loves, from the Indian White Antelope who ""pressed her body against his, her sweet smells of oil and flower petals mixing with his male odor..."" to endless others; sticklers for historical accuracy may be surprised to read of the use of chloroform as an anaesthetic some 30 years before its announced discovery. Written in old-pulp English and aimed at paper-back reprint, this book may appeal to historically illiterate readers who are not unduly fussy about literary style; those who like straight biography will shun it.

Pub Date: April 6th, 1960
Publisher: Coward-McCann