THE PRIME MINISTER'S DAUGHTER by Maurice Edelman
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THE PRIME MINISTER'S DAUGHTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

While not a sequel to The Minister, this resumes the story of the new P.M. Melville and his family, and Maurice Edelman, who cuts a much more dapper figure in the corridors of power than Sir Charles, has provided a very elegant entertainment indeed. While practical politics and some of the in-and-out fighting (in this case, a king-making, image-making Fleet Street magnate anxious to secure a peerage) are very much a part of the background, the story itself concerns Melville's daughter, Sylvia, who has just returned from the U.S. after an unhappy affair with a Columbia professor, Don Cullen. Sylvia, pulling out of a depressed, difficult time, is considerably set back by one of Don's abrupt appearances and disappearances; under the influence of too many sleeping pills, she has an accident at the wheel and is accused of drunken driving, a scandal which will threaten her father's career but will ultimately strengthen the Melvilles' domestic rapport... All of this has a greater romantic potential and personal interest than Edelman's last books and it is both sophisticated and informed. As such it should receive a show of public confidence in terms of a popular readership.

Pub Date: April 19th, 1965
Publisher: Random House