MAKING A NEW HOME IN AMERICA by Maxine B. Rosenberg

MAKING A NEW HOME IN AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Through the words of several seven- and eight-year-old children, the author reveals mixed emotions about the changes involved in coming to the US. The children have left Japan, Cuba, India, and Guyana; two are here temporarily, two have come to stay. The reasons range from a parent's job transfer to the need for freedom of speech. The children's reactions are explored with a candor that rings true and holds interest. Japanese Jiri's misbehavior in school is given as much attention as Guyanese Carmen's awe at America's material splendor. Rosenberg has a difficult juggling act in intertwining the four profiles. We see the commonalities of the four experiences, but occasionally there is confusion, as when a paragraph starts out with Jiri but ends up with Dasiely, who is pictured. Also confusing is an epilogue from a 16-year-old Vietnamese refugee that seems an afterthought. His story may show that time brings economic and social success, but that point already comes through with plenty of punch in Carmen's words that precede it: ""I was happy to come to America."" Ancona's sharp photos draw us into natural home, neighborhood, and school scenes. The children's sparkling eyes look terrific on exceptionally fine paper, adding to the desire to view, review, and understand.

Pub Date: March 21st, 1986
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard