THE SCIENCE OF MUSIC by Melvin Berger

THE SCIENCE OF MUSIC

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The nature of music, how musical instruments make the sounds they do, and how music is recorded and reproduced. All musical instruments make sounds by causing the air to vibrate in a precisely controlled manner. Strings may be stroked or hammered--as with the violin and piano; or various materials may be made to vibrate by blowing air past them--as with the lips for the trumpet or cane reeds for the clarinet. Most instruments make various notes; some--such as the triangle--only make single sounds. The personality of each instrument is dictated by its physics. The technical material here is largely current and accurate--although the author does make the common error of claiming (on different pages) that C = 256 and A = 440; not in the same scale, they don't! The section on stereo recording and reproduction is very telegraphic, provides uneven treatment of topics, but is satisfactory as an introduction. But--cavils aside--this is a nicely compact view of musical physics and engineering, a useful and interesting book. A list ""For Further Reading"" includes mostly adult materials; illustrations and index not seen.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1989
Page count: 160pp
Publisher: Crowell