Writing advice both practical and inspirational.

WRITE A POEM, SAVE YOUR LIFE

A GUIDE FOR TEENS, TEACHERS, AND WRITERS OF ALL AGES

A handbook for using poetry as a journey to self-expression and empowerment.

Poet and educator Heller presents a guide born out of her personal experience of turning to poetry to process multiple emotional and physical traumas in adolescence. In her introduction she describes a nomadic existence of “kicking around with a free-spirited gang of musicians, experimenting with drugs and sex, testing our edges, all of us desperately wanting to figure out who we are and what we believe in.” Poetry was a lifeline: “Working on poetry becomes a reason to live…a way to channel my overwhelming feelings and make…beauty from suffering.” She now leads poetry workshops for students of many ages and backgrounds in schools and institutions, including juvenile detention. The book contains writing prompts designed to bolster writers’ self-confidence and develop their skills. They range from the practical (how to make a blackout poem) to techniques for sparking imagination and creativity (such as using photos of your childhood self for inspiration). Heller’s encouraging and engaging style of writing and her original voice make this work effective for use by and with young people who are grappling with varied life issues. Student poems are included with each prompt. More than a simple how-to manual, this volume is invaluable for use within and beyond the classroom.

Writing advice both practical and inspirational. (Nonfiction. 12-adult)

Pub Date: May 4, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-60868-748-0

Page Count: 256

Publisher: New World Library

Review Posted Online: April 8, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2021

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Small but mighty necessary reading.

THE NEW QUEER CONSCIENCE

From the Pocket Change Collective series

A miniature manifesto for radical queer acceptance that weaves together the personal and political.

Eli, a cis gay white Jewish man, uses his own identities and experiences to frame and acknowledge his perspective. In the prologue, Eli compares the global Jewish community to the global queer community, noting, “We don’t always get it right, but the importance of showing up for other Jews has been carved into the DNA of what it means to be Jewish. It is my dream that queer people develop the same ideology—what I like to call a Global Queer Conscience.” He details his own isolating experiences as a queer adolescent in an Orthodox Jewish community and reflects on how he and so many others would have benefitted from a robust and supportive queer community. The rest of the book outlines 10 principles based on the belief that an expectation of mutual care and concern across various other dimensions of identity can be integrated into queer community values. Eli’s prose is clear, straightforward, and powerful. While he makes some choices that may be divisive—for example, using the initialism LGBTQIAA+ which includes “ally”—he always makes clear those are his personal choices and that the language is ever evolving.

Small but mighty necessary reading. (resources) (Nonfiction. 14-18)

Pub Date: June 2, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-593-09368-9

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Penguin Workshop

Review Posted Online: March 29, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2020

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This guide to Black culture for White people is accessible but rarely easy.

UNCOMFORTABLE CONVERSATIONS WITH A BLACK MAN

A former NFL player casts his gimlet eye on American race relations.

In his first book, Acho, an analyst for Fox Sports who grew up in Dallas as the son of Nigerian immigrants, addresses White readers who have sent him questions about Black history and culture. “My childhood,” he writes, “was one big study abroad in white culture—followed by studying abroad in black culture during college and then during my years in the NFL, which I spent on teams with 80-90 percent black players, each of whom had his own experience of being a person of color in America. Now, I’m fluent in both cultures: black and white.” While the author avoids condescending to readers who already acknowledge their White privilege or understand why it’s unacceptable to use the N-word, he’s also attuned to the sensitive nature of the topic. As such, he has created “a place where questions you may have been afraid to ask get answered.” Acho has a deft touch and a historian’s knack for marshaling facts. He packs a lot into his concise narrative, from an incisive historical breakdown of American racial unrest and violence to the ways of cultural appropriation: Your friend respecting and appreciating Black arts and culture? OK. Kim Kardashian showing off her braids and attributing her sense of style to Bo Derek? Not so much. Within larger chapters, the text, which originated with the author’s online video series with the same title, is neatly organized under helpful headings: “Let’s rewind,” “Let’s get uncomfortable,” “Talk it, walk it.” Acho can be funny, but that’s not his goal—nor is he pedaling gotcha zingers or pleas for headlines. The author delivers exactly what he promises in the title, tackling difficult topics with the depth of an engaged cultural thinker and the style of an experienced wordsmith. Throughout, Acho is a friendly guide, seeking to sow understanding even if it means risking just a little discord.

This guide to Black culture for White people is accessible but rarely easy.

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-250-80046-6

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Flatiron Books

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2020

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