NICOLE VISITS AN AMISH FARM by Merle Good

NICOLE VISITS AN AMISH FARM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Nicole is a black city child whose Fresh-Air Fund visit to an Amish farm involves her in the everyday activities of Charity, a friendly hostess and one of the family's several children. In the brief text and candid-looking photos, we see the two girls pumping water for the family wash, picking vegetables from the family garden (another garden, the ""truck patch,"" is for selling), helping to load bales of hay on the wagon, canning peaches with an aunt, riding in an uncle's buggy, playing with the farm animals, and participating in the family's nightly Bible reading. Though Nicole's parents have warned her that there will be few cars and no TV, Nicole decides early on to go home, removing an Amish-style dress made just for her by Charity's mother. (She missed her mother, daddy and sister--""But more than anything she missed television."") Wisely, Charity's mother suggests a letter home instead, and, to the family's credit, subsequent photos show Nicole back in her shorts and camisole. There's no hint in this photo-visit of why the Amish live as they do. (Only a small-print, abstractly worded, two-page appendix attempts a general description of their customs and values.) However, as a first look at the way of life, this is helped by Nicole's presence--which can serve as an entry for other non-Amish children, as well as an example of cultural exchange.

Pub Date: July 15th, 1982
Publisher: Walker