THE PRINCESS AND THE SNOWBIRD

Harrison’s two earlier titles, The Princess and the Hound (2007) and The Princess and the Bear (2009), were beautifully restrained tales of the magical ties between humans and animals, the fear of magic and the power of the forest. In this book, Liva, daughter of the Hound and the Bear, has inherited their powerful magic. She knows her parents mostly in animal form, and they keep her away from humans. Liva can transform into almost any animal at will, and she knows their languages and their secrets. But human magic and animal magic are at war, and a terrible stone can leach the magic and dissipate it. Jens, a man who has no magic, finds himself opposed to the campaign of a human Hunter who seeks to destroy all the animal magic, and he and Liva are drawn together powerfully. The author’s gift for delineating animal natures and human attraction is still evident, but this is a much less nuanced and structured story than its predecessors, with too much telling rather than showing and not enough depth or character development. The snowbird of the title plays a lovely but not entirely convincing role in a magical denouement. Each of these titles stands alone, but this one is less satisfying than the other two. (Fantasy. 12 & up)

Pub Date: May 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-06-155317-2

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Wicker Park/Academy Chicago

Review Posted Online: June 23, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2010

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How can such a hefty tome be un-put-down-able excitement from beginning to end? (glossary) (Fantasy. 14 & up)

CROOKED KINGDOM

From the Six of Crows series , Vol. 2

This hefty sequel to Six of Crows (2015) brings high-tension conclusions to the many intertwined intrigues of Ketterdam.

It's time for revenge—has been ever since old-before-his-time crook Kaz and his friends were double-crossed by the merchant princes of Ketterdam, an early-industrial Amsterdam-like fantasy city filled to the brim with crime and corruption. Disabled, infuriated, and perpetually scheming Kaz, the light-skinned teen mastermind, coordinates the efforts to rescue Inej. Though Kaz is loath to admit weakness, Inej is his, for he can't bear any harm come to the knife-wielding, brown-skinned Suli acrobat. Their team is rounded out by Wylan, a light-skinned chemist and musician whose merchant father tried to have him murdered and who can't read due to a print disability; Wylan's brown-skinned biracial boyfriend, Jesper, a flirtatious gambler with ADHD; Nina, the pale brunette Grisha witch and recovering addict from Russia-like Ravka; Matthias, Nina's national enemy and great love, a big, white, blond drüskelle warrior from the cold northern lands; and Kuwei, the rescued Shu boy everyone wants to kidnap. Can these kids rescue everyone who needs rescuing in Ketterdam's vile political swamp? This is dark and violent—one notable scene features a parade of teens armed with revolvers, rifles, pistols, explosives, and flash bombs—but gut-wrenchingly genuine. Astonishingly, Bardugo keeps all these balls in the air over the 500-plus pages of narrative.

How can such a hefty tome be un-put-down-able excitement from beginning to end? (glossary) (Fantasy. 14 & up)

Pub Date: Sept. 27, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-62779-213-4

Page Count: 560

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: Aug. 2, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2016

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A slow-building tale of deception and struggle against societal bounds.

PRIDE AND PREMEDITATION

From the Jane Austen Murder Mysteries series , Vol. 1

A young woman intent on a position in her father’s law firm plays sleuth in this mystery reworking of Pride and Prejudice.

When Charles Bingley, head of a local shipping firm, is accused of the murder of his brother-in-law, George Hurst, Lizzie Bennet inserts herself in the case in an effort to prove her worth beyond her potential success in securing a respectable marriage. Mr. Darcy, Wickham, Mr. Collins, Jane, Charlotte, and the extensive cast of source characters all appear here, altered and with different roles though generally retaining their personalities and idiosyncrasies. Readers familiar with Jane Austen’s work will get the most from this novel, but even for those who aren’t, the book stands on its own as a solid, if at times plodding, whodunit. Though not a modernization, there are modern sensibilities at play, discussed by Price in an author’s note and expressed in passages about class and sex roles that are much more expository than the original. This style of telling rather than showing extends across Lizzy’s relationships with both Wickham and Darcy, though descriptions of the former are also happily peppered with dryly witty dialogue. Most characters are White; Charlotte is biracial, with a White father and Black mother from the West Indies.

A slow-building tale of deception and struggle against societal bounds. (Mystery. 12-18)

Pub Date: March 9, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-06-288980-5

Page Count: 368

Publisher: HarperTeen

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2021

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