THE FIVE MILLION DOLLAR PRINCE by Michael Butterworth

THE FIVE MILLION DOLLAR PRINCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Another far-fetched but endearing comedy-scam from inventive British suspense-clown Butterworth--not as entrancing as X Marks the Spot, but wryly amusing nonetheless. The unlikely heroes here are an odd couple of con men: Horace Bunbury, a one-time Oxford scholar brought to virtual bum-hood via a broken heart, booze, and poor performance as a London tourguide; and suave Thomas O'Leary, a more professional sort of crook, ""late of the Irish Guards."" Teaming up, Bunbury and O'Leary decide--ludicrous as it may seem--to sell the massive, hideous Albert Memorial to George Sawtry, a rich, oafish Texan, in London on his honeymoon with wife #7, the former DesirÉe Hofmayer. Ridiculous? Perhaps. But the real complications set in after Sawtry is persuaded to pay $5 million for the Memorial at an elaborately faked-up auction. The con men's scheme for cashing the $5-million check goes awry; Sawtry starts insisting on immediate delivery; and Mrs. Sawtry, no fool, sees through the seam and blackmails the con men into joining in a murder plot. . .one that doesn't quite go as planned. Despite the dated rich-Texan stereotype and the basic implausibility: engaging, tongue-in-check capering--given some welcome warmth by Bunbury's guilt-ridden romance with one of the con artists' many (minor) victims.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1986
Publisher: Doubleday