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JUST ASK THE UNIVERSE by Michael Samules

JUST ASK THE UNIVERSE

A No-Nonsense Guide to Manifesting your Dreams

By Michael Samules

Pub Date: Sept. 16th, 2011
ISBN: 978-0615501291
Publisher: Michael Okon

Drawing on the professed wisdom of wealth and happiness-now motivators, Samuels tells in this slim volume how to put the universe to work fulfilling clearly expressed personal wants.

Samuels, inspired initially by a Tony Robbins infomercial to quit living with his parents and strike out on the high toad to success, witnesses convincingly about the universe’s largesse once he went from nay-saying pessimist to true believer. Having reaped asked-for rewards for himself, he seeks here in serviceable if sometimes simplistic prose to share the good news about the universe’s unfailing willingness to give us everything we desire if we can just follow a few simple steps. Step one is writing down a list of specific wants; ask not merely for a new car but for a particular make and model, and don’t forget to say what color interior. Next, command the conscious mind to pass along this want list to the subconscious mind. Then wait patiently while the universe, which Samuels defines as everything and everywhere, handles the rest. Throughout, just make sure to maintain a positive attitude; the universe doesn’t like a whiner. No need to wonder how and why it works; without apology, the author doesn’t. After all, Samuels argues, do we need to think about why a light goes on every time we throw the switch? Neither is chanting, meditating or New Age babble required. Samuels dislikes these sorts of things. He does toss around the term karma, but shows limited understanding of this esoteric law. The book, readable in under an hour, is, at bottom, Samuel’s personal distillation of the sagacity of seers who say wealth and happiness is the mind’s to create. Napoleon Hill, Wallace D. Wattles and The Secret author Rhonda Byrne join Robbins and many likeminded others as his teachers. Samuels is to be commended for giving credence to his thesis in at least one regard—writing the book fulfills an item on his want list. The universe has apparently delivered, in a credible if barebones fashion.

A sincere effort and just possibly a dim reflection of profound truths.