THE RIGHT TO BE PEOPLE by Mildred Adams

THE RIGHT TO BE PEOPLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Participant Maud Wood Park's Front Door Lobby (see p. 889, 1960) is surprisingly one of the few books available on the subject of woman suffrage. Mildred Adams thus fills a gap in the popular literature with a solid if rather stolid account of the events that led to the passing of the 19th Amendment. It is mainly the story of dedicated women-- Mary Wollstonecraft, Suzanne Necker, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, Anna Howard Shaw, Carrie Lane Chapman Catt--who were determined to gain their right to be people. From Mrs. Stanton's Declaration of Sentiments at Seneca Falls in 1848 to victory on August 26, 1920, they devoted energy and funds (the campaign for woman suffrage was ""largely a pin-money campaign""). Miss Adams' book is a record and reminder for the beneficiaries of their battle.

Pub Date: Jan. 27th, 1966
Publisher: Lippincott