HISTORY IN HARNESS: The Story of Horses by Mildred Boyd

HISTORY IN HARNESS: The Story of Horses

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KIRKUS REVIEW

As a history of the various ways men have put horses to use, the book is random in its information. The major emphasis is on the way horses have been honored and on horse celebrities in legend and fact. The first of the book's three sections supposedly traces the partnership between man and horse, but following a cursory survey of the biological development of the horse, the rest consists mostly of Greek myths and other legends in which horses figured. The second deals with the uses of horses ""In War"" (the most coverage) ""At Work"" and ""At Play"" but is pretty selective in terms of the more glamorous ways that the animal has proved indispensible. The last is made up of 14 dramatized episodes in which famous horses figured (Bucephalus, Comanche, and Man of War are probably the best known). In historical terms, the book is probably strongest in its portrayal of the long tradition of respect for horsemanship. The stories of particular horses are fairly entertaining.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1965
Publisher: Criterion