EVERY DAY I HAVE A JOURNEY by Miles Clark

EVERY DAY I HAVE A JOURNEY

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The author, son of Glenn Clark, late founder of the ""Camps Farthest Out"" movement, offers a more or less autobiographical description of various aspects of religious experience. The traditional figure of the spiritual Journey is meant to organize the development, but there does not seem to be any very clear sense of progress in the book. A ""meander"" rather than a journey might be the more appropriate symbol. Anecdotes and stories of persons who have experienced various sorts of interior transformations furnish the substance for much of the discussion. This anecdotal character betrays the lack of any firm discipline in the handling of the material. It may be taken as characteristic of much that goes on in the ""Camps Farthest Out"" movement. The author has read widely, but not selectively; and now and then suggests rather indiscriminate lists of reading for his readers. There are indications, here and there, that some sort of interior distress has been encountered by the author, who speaks of times of ""darkness"" and of ""emotional floods. The book may be attractive to readers whose religious interests resemble those of the movement in which the author's experience is rooted. Others may find it banal.

Pub Date: Sept. 13th, 1967
Publisher: Harper & Row