THE DANGEROUS GAME by Milton Dank

THE DANGEROUS GAME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A Resistance hero at sixteen, Charles has idealistically decided to join the clandestine operation rather than flee Paris as the occupying Nazis enter. His first assignment--watching Gestapo headquarters from a cafe across the street-- results in his arrest for questioning and an unforgettable glimpse of the dangers of the game. But Charles, now cool, quick-thinking ""falcon,"" goes on. . . until he is finally whisked out of the country after shooting, from a balcony of that very headquarters, the turncoat British radio operator who has betrayed Charles' comrades. (Among those captured as a result was lovely nineteen-year-old Seagull, with whom Charles had shared more than their crucial, top-level mission.) In the end Charles, in Britain and about to join the Free French intelligence, is a seasoned man of seventeen, marked by the tragedy of his losses. It's a veritable dream of glory (Charles is even a wine connoisseur of sorts, attracting unwanted attention only when he orders vintages in cafes not accustomed to such distinctions) but Dank, who bases this on his narrative history for adults (The French Against the French, 1974), knows the scene well, depicts its dangers chillingly, and makes a credible and totally involving adventure of Charles' role in the net-work.

Pub Date: Sept. 16th, 1977
Publisher: Lippincott