A HARVEST OF RUSSIAN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE by Miriam-Ed. Morton
Kirkus Star

A HARVEST OF RUSSIAN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A review of this landmark anthology could be as long as the editor's informative introduction; this one will confine itself to the essentials on the assumption that librarians know a good thing when they see it... In three general age groups (five to seven, eight to eleven, twelve to about fifteen) are verse, stories folktales, fables, poems and excerpts from longer works from 1825 to the present; all are currently available in the Soviet Union. Together they provide a sampling of Russian children's literature for American children; an acquaintance with this significant and largely unknown corpus for adults working with children and books; an insight into the cultural conditioning of the Russian child for anyone interested. Mrs. Morton who previously translated Kornei Chukovsky's From Two to Five (and answered criticisms from the author with grace and good sense), has translated more than half of the selections and edited others; she also introduces the individual authors and pieces. Outstanding are the rhymes and short tales for the very young and the realistic prose and poems by adult authors for older children: the former have potential appeal because of their vivacity and humor, the latter because of their conviction leavened with wit and compassion. The book will include almost a hundred illustrations taken from Soviet children's books, and a foreword by Ruth Hill Viguers; even as it stands, it can only be called notable.

Pub Date: Aug. 30th, 1967
Publisher: Univ. of California Press