The highlights of this collection are the notes and the CD itself; jazz aficionados wishing to share their enthusiasm with...

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UNDER THE MOON

JAZZ STANDARDS AND LULLABIES PERFORMED BY ELLA FITZGERALD, LOUIS ARMSTRONG, NINA SIMONE...

An anthology of familiar songs from the mid-20th century are gathered in a petite picture book, with illustrations, notes, and an accompanying CD.

Green’s style features many light, curling lines filled in with mostly washed-out, pastel colors, human figures sharing the picture plane with vegetation, birds, clouds, and snowflakes. Occasionally she chooses to place these figures in a setting, as in a black man strumming a guitar in a rocking chair, surrounded by cotton bolls and underneath puffy clouds that leak large raindrops for “Stormy Weather.” Her style eschews perspective, giving the pictures a childlike look. Each song is given one or two double-page spreads and is accompanied by a compressed but informative note by Françoise Tenier via translation by David Lytle and Hélène Roulston. These are aimed at adult readers and offer valuable insights. Mystifyingly, the lyrics to two songs are not reproduced while others are; that these are the first two songs in the book (“Willow Weep for Me,” sung by Billie Holiday, and “Gone with the Wind,” sung by Julie London) is deeply unfortunate. Green depicts both black and white children and adults, but some may be taken aback at her choice to pair white or light-skinned women with songs from Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, and Sarah Vaughan.

The highlights of this collection are the notes and the CD itself; jazz aficionados wishing to share their enthusiasm with their children may find it a useful vehicle. (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2016

ISBN: 978-2-924217-78-8

Page Count: 36

Publisher: The Secret Mountain

Review Posted Online: Sept. 19, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2016

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A high-spirited impetus to clap hands—or better yet, someone else’s.

HIGH FIVE

The Dragons Love Tacos (2012) crew invites readers to the 75th Annual High Five Tournament.

It’s not going to be a walkover, as opponents in the five rounds range from Gigantic the Bear (“700 Pounds of Hair”) and, after her, dizzying bouncer Kangaroo Paul to the ultimate challenger, eight-limbed Octopus Jones. Fortunately, young contenders have a yetilike ex-champ in their corner to offer vigorous if unevenly rhymed and metered commentary (“Was that your new signature slap? / My grandma fives better than that!”) as well as savvy advice on hand positioning and style points. Accentuated by block letters in diverse hues and the occasional outsized “HIGH FIVE!” Salmieri’s scribbly ink-and–colored-pencil drawings of the all-animal cast, audience, and panel of judges reflect the infectiously rising suspense and wild excitement as the unseen “Kid” the narrator addresses sends each foe in succession reeling away in stunned defeat. Just one thing left to do: “Hold up your trophy / and shout out ‘woo-hoo!’ / The new high five champ is you!” Along with the verbal coaching, a chart of variations on “The Classic,” such as “The Windmill,” “The Double Behind the Back Slam,” and even “The High Foot,” offers further challenges to ambitious fivers of all genders. As characters frequently address “Kid” directly and hold up dramatically foreshortened hands or paws to viewers, caregivers should be ready for this book to take a beating.

A high-spirited impetus to clap hands—or better yet, someone else’s. (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: April 16, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-525-42889-3

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: Jan. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2019

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A multilayered coming-of-age story filled with exquisitely executed art.

CAMP TIGER

A little boy finds his inner tiger in this lyrical picture-book debut by Choi, an award-winning author for adults.

Narrated in a thoughtful, meandering voice that mimics a long scenic drive into the mountains, a boy, his older brother, and their parents travel to a camping site at Mountain Pond, which is “like a mirror in the trees.” Throughout the trip the boy vocalizes his apprehensions about growing up and becoming a first-grader, saying he “liked kindergarten” and misses “things my mom used to do for me.” Suddenly everyone is struck silent when a tiger approaches from the temperate forest, asking for an extra tent to sleep in. The boy and the tiger quickly connect. Soon the tiger becomes the personification of the growing inner courage of the boy, participating in all the activities. The boy accomplishes new milestones: catching his first fish, steering the canoe well, and striking out on his own. Rocco provides illustrations with a cool color scheme and dramatic details. Elongated sentences demand that readers linger on each page drinking in every detail of the tiger’s striking portraits. There is a slight disconnect in tone between the whimsy of the text and the realism of the illustrations, but it is a small price to pay. The boys appear Asian or biracial Asian/white.

A multilayered coming-of-age story filled with exquisitely executed art. (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: May 21, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-399-17329-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: Feb. 17, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2019

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