ISSUN BOSHI, THE INCHLING: An Old Tale of Japan by Momoko Ishii

ISSUN BOSHI, THE INCHLING: An Old Tale of Japan

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Because he is small, Inchling is a natural for small children; because of the dramatic contrast of his size with the surrounding world, he is a natural for imaginative pictorialization. In this Japanese-produced version, full advantage is taken of enlarged close-ups and distant views from a variety of perspectives to follow the little fellow as he dons his soup bowl hat and sets off for the capital, encountering an ant his own size beside a path of starry dandelions, later picking his way among myriad feet until he stands before the steps of a beautiful mansion; we see him as the princess' pet, arranging her dice, then as her protector stabbing the demons with his needle sword, finally as her husband welcoming his aged parents. We see because the illustrations, vibrating with color and movement, are always at the service of the story; the story could be told from them. A highly effective import that you needn't be a connoisseur to enjoy.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Walker