A BRIEF DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN by Morinosuke Kajima

A BRIEF DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A member of Japan's upper house, with long and varied experience in government, Morinosuke Kajima recounts and interprets the history of diplomatic relations since Japan first relinquished its policy of seclusion and entered into intercourse with Western powers at Commodore Perry's insistence in 1854. There followed dealings with China, England, Russia, the annexation of Korea, World War I, Versailles, the Washington Conference of 1921. The author assesses the foreign policy from the Manchurian Incident to the Occupation as ""haphazard"" and bypasses World War II until its conclusion. The subsequent U.S. Security Treaty terminates in 1970, thereby causing fresh anxiety for a nation if it would remain neutral. There is an extended analysis of Japanese-Korean relations, of those with National and Communist China and an account of economic diplomacy and reparations. Fundamental foreign policy today is based on ""cooperation with the free world community,"" ""support of the United Nations,"" and ""being a staunch member state of the Asian community."" A patriotic and rather simplistic other-view for perusal here.

Pub Date: Sept. 15th, 1965
Publisher: Tuttle