THE HOUSE IN THE ATTIC by Moyra McGavin

THE HOUSE IN THE ATTIC

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is the author's second doll book (Sarabel, 1961) and while it is possible to share the make-believe if mundane world of an imaginary family living in Janet's doll house, the curious behavior of Janet's family is an imposition on anyone's credulity. The book fails to identify the time at which the story takes place, the locale, or the age of the heroine. Janet lives with her aunt and uncle. After her father's death, her mother went to Canada to ""clear up some business affairs"" and stayed on (because her mother was ill) for so long that Janet could not remember her. Her mother does send frequent presents--among them a doll house. But Janet prefers an aged one in the forbidden attic inhabited by the imaginary Burlydoes. Janet converses at length with Mrs. B., a tiresome, cranky house-wife who demands that Janet destroy her mother's other gifts. Mother finally writes that she will return home but Janet no longer wants her and fears her misdemeanours will be discovered. The day before her arrival time Janet plays in the attic and a lovely, friendly lady joins her. Sighs Janet, ""I wish you were my mother"" and guess what ....Janet's home life is only carelessly described, but the implications of the details provided are irresponsibily bewildering, and much too important to young girls to remain ambiguous.

Pub Date: Oct. 14th, 1966
Publisher: Coward-McCann