BLUE-COLLAR JOBS FOR WOMEN by Muriel Lederer

BLUE-COLLAR JOBS FOR WOMEN

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

In a classic display of understatement, Lederer achnowledges that the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook ""rates a special thank-you"" for assisting her in the preparation of the book. ""A special thank-you"" hardly seems adequate when one considers that much of the text of Blue-Collar is identical to that of Handbook. For example, the description of a locomotive engineer given in Blue-Collar reads: ""Engineers operate locomotives in passenger, freight, and yard services. Road service engineers transport cargo and passengers . . . ."" Unbelievably, this is the exact, word-for-word description previously offeted in Handbook. And that's not an isolated occurrence. Besides innumerable similarities in phrasing, there is also a certain uniformity of content between the two. Both utilize the same job categories; detail the training and/or schooling prospective applicants should have; describe earnings and working conditions; consider potential growth in various job markets; list places to write to solicit additional job information. Blue-Collar differs from Handbook in containing case histories of successful blue-collar women and offering some general femaleoriented observations. But in most cases Handbook has already said it all earlier, and if not in the same manner, then better.

Pub Date: Feb. 28th, 1978
Publisher: Dutton