MY SERENGETI YEARS: The Memoirs of an African Game Warden by Myles Turner

MY SERENGETI YEARS: The Memoirs of an African Game Warden

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Clipped and dryly related memoirs of a former and longtime African game warden in the Serengeti National Park. Raised in Kenya, British-born Turner came full-circle into the conservation movement after more than a decade of work in the 1940's as a paid government hunter(destroying crop-raiding animals) and a professional safari leader. Here, he recounts the creation of Tanzania's Serengeti park, and his role front the 1950's to the 1970's in helping to protect its wildlife. We learn of Turner's slowly achieved successes in reducing wide-scale poaching; his establishment of new and effective ranger stations; his dealings with dignitaries, visiting VIP's, and noted scientists: and his personal experiences with wife, Kay, in raising a family in the wild. But his accounts are far too terse and scattered; and there are all-too-many, and gory, descriptions of predators and poachers capturing and devouring prey, as well as tales of close calls with all manner of wild animal--from poisonous cobras to ill-tempered buffalo. A dull read--of interest primarily, then, as a historical chronicle of early East African conservation efforts. Illustrated.

Pub Date: May 9th, 1988
ISBN: 0393333787
Publisher: Norton