Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 2)

Crimson Park by C.J. Booth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"A thriller with an endlessly twisty plot and plenty of lingering questions for a third book to answer."
A California cold-case division finds that the disappearance of a B-movie director/producer isn't nearly as straightforward as it initially seems in Booth's (Olive Park, 2011) sequel.Read full book review >
THRILL KILL by Brian Thiem
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"No surprises here, but Thiem's tough-but-tender hero's dedication to a routine so grueling it feels authentic puts the procedure back in procedural."
The second case for Oakland PD Sgt. Matt Sinclair (Red Line, 2015) hits a little closer to home than he'd like. Read full book review >

SURVIVORS WILL BE SHOT AGAIN by Bill Crider
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"The ambling plot makes room for a few sharp deductions and the usual mild humor—nothing to frighten the horses or raise fans' blood pressure."
A string of low-level burglaries plagues Blacklin County, Texas, spelling trouble for Sheriff Dan Rhodes and his deputies (Between the Living and the Dead, 2015, etc.) and two dead men. Read full book review >
THE YELLOW DIAMOND by Andrew Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Full of memorable character portraits and incisive observations on wealth and social class, this stylish departure by the author of the long-running Jim Stringer series (Night Train to Jamalpur, 2014, etc.) is full of droll humor."
When a veteran detective is shot while on special assignment, uncovering the truth involves layers of deceit and secrets that might be best left unrevealed. Read full book review >
THESE HONORED DEAD by Jonathan F. Putnam
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Putnam combines the historical fact of a lifelong friendship with lively fiction in a debut set on the edge of the American frontier."
A lovesick storekeeper and a newly minted Illinois lawyer pool their talents in a murder case. Read full book review >

WHEN THE MUSIC'S OVER by Peter Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Despite the double plot requiring two virtually unrelated pools of characters, the thematic connections between the cold case and the red-hot case are so pervasive and powerful that the result is one of the most tightly spun tales to come from Robinson's remorseless imagination."
Alan Banks' first case as detective superintendent is a 50-year-old sex crime that's echoed by an equally appalling assault in present-day Eastvale. Read full book review >
A MASQUERADE OF MUERTOS by Patrice Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"The late-blooming mystery runs a very distant second to the interesting and extremely detailed descriptions of artwork, costumes, and Santa Fe."
A group of goth friends plan a Halloween shindig that will turn out even more special than they can know. Read full book review >
THE PARIS LIBRARIAN by Mark Pryor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"More cerebral than Pryor's earlier cases (The Reluctant Matador, 2015, etc.), but fans will still find plenty of action."
A Paris librarian's death is just the start of a series of mysterious occurrences. Read full book review >
THE DAMASCUS THREAT by Matt Rees
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"This series kickoff by the author of the Omar Yussef thrillers (The Fourth Assassin, 2010, etc.) keeps the action and the close calls coming and tucks colorful characters into unexpected corners. Crackerjack entertainment, even if it mostly feels familiar."
In a race against the clock, an American special agent crisscrosses New York and travels to Syria to prevent a devastating chemical attack. Read full book review >
THE ST. LUCIA ISLAND CLUB by Brent Monahan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"The mystery poses little challenge for Le Brun (The Manhattan Island Clubs, 2003, etc.) or the reader. But armchair travelers will enjoy the history and lyrical descriptions of St. Lucia, which has become the tourist paradise the planters were hoping for."
A 1910 honeymoon on an exotic island is rudely interrupted by multiple murders. Read full book review >
THE FEMALE DETECTIVE by Andrew Forrester
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The creaking dialogue and halting, step-by-step-by-step deductions, which guarantee a glacial pace, will keep most of the curious at bay; this is no overlooked gem. But feminists and historical completists, the most likely readers to persevere, will find themselves amply rewarded by detective tales that more often focus on how and why than whodunit."
The latest reprint in the British Library Crime Classics is one of the earliest: a cycle of stories about a London detective first published in 1864, here introduced by Alexander McCall Smith, who ventures general remarks about female detectives, and Mike Ashley, who supplies some uncommonly informative historical background. Read full book review >
DAMAGE CONTROL by Michael Bowen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The high-speed exposition leads to a brightly disillusioned tour of D.C. institutions that shine more vividly than the people who represent them in Bowen's ebullient antidote to election-season blues."
Bowen, who knows a thing or two about how the sausage is made (Service Dress Blues, 2009, etc.), follows 30 tumultuous days in the life of a Washington fundraiser who's been put on the spot. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >