Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 3)

THE EDGE OF DREAMS by Rhys Bowen
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 3, 2015

"Bowen shrewdly explores the tension between a husband and his very independent wife as they both work to solve a complicated series of murders. One of Molly's best."
Turn-of-the-century New York is plagued by an elusive serial killer. Read full book review >
WHO BURIES THE DEAD by C.S. Harris
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 3, 2015

"Disembodied heads and royal corpses play almost as great a role as the living characters in the 10th installment of St. Cyr's adventures (Why Kings Confess, 2014, etc.). Even though a long-overdue face-off falls curiously flat, the complex, brooding protagonist still dominates the action."
A collector of grisly relics meets the same fate as his most cherished items in this Regency tale. Read full book review >

CAT OUT OF HELL by Lynne Truss
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 3, 2015

"A Chinese box of anti-narrative that reads like M.R. James on bad acid with a laugh track, complete with demonic cats, murderous librarians and badly overmatched amateur sleuths."
Punctuation czar Truss (The Girl's Like Spaghetti: Why, You Can't Manage Without Apostrophes!, 2007, etc.) turns her very special talents to a cat mystery with a twist: The cats are culprits rather than sleuths or mascots.Read full book review >
MURDER ON THE CHAMP DE MARS by Cara Black
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 3, 2015

"Aimée's 15th outing is a killer, with all the suspense, all the surprise and all the Parisian flavor you'd expect from Black."
Aimée Leduc (Murder in Pigalle, 2014, etc.) puts everything on the line to solve her most vexing cold case—the murder of her father.Read full book review >
SHERLOCK HOLMES, THE MISSING YEARS: JAPAN by Vasudev Murthy
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 3, 2015

"Bound to be overshadowed by Anthony Horowitz's Moriarty (2014), which offers a quite different account of the battle between Holmes and Moriarty. That's a shame, because Murthy (The Time Merchants and Other Strange Tales, 2013, etc.) provides sturdy adventure, colorful Japanese backgrounds, and a mastery of many voices, including Watson's."
Still wondering what the great detective was doing between his reported death in 1891 and his reappearance in 1894? Actually, he was working closely with Shigeo Oshima, director of Intelligence Research for Emperor Meiji of Japan, on the shadowy Operation Kobe55. Read full book review >

KITTENS CAN KILL by Clea Simon
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 3, 2015

"Spoiler alert: The kitten doesn't kill anyone. Fanciers of chatty cat mysteries will be happy to know that all the animals survive in fine fettle."
Another suspicious death in Beauville, Massachusetts, leaves animal empath Pru Marlowe (Panthers Play for Keeps, 2014, etc.) babysitting a new kitten as she stumbles around trying to figure out who's settling old scores.Read full book review >
AN EXAGGERATED MURDER by Josh Cook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"A beautifully written postmodern novel of deduction that merrily, wittily blows up its genre's conventions while at the same time re-energizing possibilities for the 21st-century detective story."
Three things to keep in mind about this book: Travel is far more enriching than arrival, detectives are essentially professional critics, and always be very careful when you decide to quit smoking. Read full book review >
THE DEVIL'S DETECTIVE by Simon Kurt Unsworth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"A grand, nightmarish page-turner that will have you riveted no matter how much you'd prefer to look away."
Even hell has crime. And somebody has to go through…well, you know…to bring criminals to justice. Read full book review >
THE MOUTH OF THE CROCODILE by Michael Pearce
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 1, 2015

"A curiosity among Owen's 17 decorous period cases (The Bride Box, 2013, etc.): half high-risk adventure, half low-impact sleuthing, with the Mamur Zapt overshadowed by his hireling's investment-minded wife, the Pasha's sheltered but charming lady, and the alarmingly precocious Aisha."
1913. The Mamur Zapt escorts a nervous pasha home from a small town in the Sudan, where life is as predictably unpredictable as it is in Egypt. Read full book review >
MURDER IN THE QUEEN'S WARDROBE by Kathy Lynn Emerson
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 1, 2015

"Emerson's headstrong sleuth, first introduced in her Lady Appleton series, begins a diverting series of her own with lots of twists and turns and Tudor tidbits."
A lady of strong character is recruited as a spy in 1582 England. Read full book review >
STAR FALL by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 1, 2015

"Though the answers aren't nearly as interesting as the questions themselves, Harrod-Eagles (Hard Going, 2014, etc.) is never less than expert in presenting suspects, combing through the evidence, varying the tone and showing new ways that Egerton was even more of a bounder than you suspected."
DI Bill Slider asks why the thief who killed West London television personality Rowland Egerton in his home ignored his wallet and most of his treasures and made off with exactly two items. Read full book review >
THE TOMB IN TURKEY by Simon Brett
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 1, 2015

"The sitcom humor is anodyne but gently effective. There are so few suspects that you'll spot the killer early on, unless of course you're Jude, preoccupied with the men staring at her cleavage, or Carole, checking to make sure she's remembered to take along her Imodium."
Vacationing in Turkey, amateur sleuths Carole Seddon and Jude Nichol bring their unique combination of lightweight Fethering conflicts and murder most foul with them. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >