Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 3)

ADAM'S RIB by Antonio Manzini
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"It's hard to believe the ingenuity behind the central mystery, which seems routine until the denouement. But Schiavone (Black Run, 2015) continues to make a memorable companion in crime."
Still smarting from the assault on a rapist that got him banished from Rome to pokey Val d'Aosta, Deputy Police Chief Rocco Schiavone goes after whomever killed a local lady and tried to make her death look like suicide. Read full book review >
THE COASTER by Erich Wurster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"With its fish-out-of-water plot and cartoonish characters, this would make a perfect beach read for account executives and unprepared heirs."
Wurster's first novel plunges an amiable Kansas City househusband, a self-described "coaster," into perilously deep waters—first financial, then criminal. Read full book review >

THE NINJA'S DAUGHTER by Susan Spann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The fourth in this entertaining series (Flask of the Drunken Master, 2015, etc.) is a nicely balanced combination of mystery, political machinations, and Japanese customs."
A 16th-century ninja and priest make an oddly effective pair of sleuths. Read full book review >
MISS DIMPLE AND THE SLIGHTLY BEWILDERED ANGEL by Mignon F. Ballard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"A heartwarming cozy, more notable for period details than mystery, pleasantly enriched by the meeting of Ballard's two sleuthing heroines."
The murder of a newcomer to the little Georgia town of Elderberry deeply disturbs longtime residents. Read full book review >
ST. LOUIS NOIR by Scott Phillips
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Phillips' collection eschews the professional: readers will search in vain for flatfeet, gumshoes, or other traditional noir heroes. Just plain old folks being plain old ornery in this spirited, black-hearted collection."
Joining Seattle, Memphis, Phoenix, and other noir outposts, St. Louis gets a turn to show its dark side in Phillips' collection of 13 dark tales and a poetic interlude. Read full book review >

The Darkness Knows by Cheryl Honigford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The predictable plot doesn't get in the way of the characters' charm, though a sharper focus on the distinctive 1930s setting could have added a bit more fun to the follies in this bright debut."
A rising radio star recruits a private eye to help her investigate the murder of a co-worker in the hope that she won't be the next victim. Read full book review >
BRAIN STORM  by Elaine Viets
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Viets' new series launch carries more heft than her earlier cozies (Catnapped!, 2014, etc.). Her complicated heroine deserves a return outing."
A death investigator battles to clear the neurosurgeon who saved her life. Read full book review >
A TIME OF TORMENT by John Connolly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"No more likely than late Faulkner novels to win new fans for the author, but bestselling author Connolly's fans, who already know what they like, won't care a bit."
Beneath the generic title—when is it not a time of torment for seen-it-all detective Charlie Parker?—lurks a supernatural nightmare within a criminal nightmare. Read full book review >
IN THE LAND OF MILK AND HONEY by Jane Jensen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Surprisingly engrossing, with a pace that effectively builds suspense concerning both the mystery and the heroine's personal problems. Jensen once again spins a seemingly fanciful topic into a solid reading pleasure."
A detective investigating a series of deaths in the local Amish community finds that her personal ties to the community both help and hinder her work. Read full book review >
THE DISCOURTESY OF DEATH by William Brodrick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"The fifth outing for Brodrick's clerical hero (The Day of the Lie, 2012, etc.) strikes a nice balance between sleuthing and character-driven suspense."
A brilliant clergyman and occasional sleuth is again tempted away from the monastic life, this time to probe the suspicious death of a paralyzed young mother. Read full book review >
THE GILDED CAGE by Lucinda Gray
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"A fast-paced, satisfying historical novel with a gutsy heroine and an intriguing 19th-century mystery at its core. (Historical mystery. 12 & up)"
Newfound family wealth draws a teenage Virginia farm girl into a murder mystery set in upper-crust England in the 1820s. Read full book review >
A SCREAM IN SOHO by John G. Brandon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"Given the proportions of the main ingredients—unbridled criminal mayhem, stolid and limited detection, striking but disposable characters, a smidgen of mysterymongering—in the stew he's served, Brandon's matter-of-fact hero may represent a missing link between Bulldog Drummond and Jack Reacher."
Another trip to the vaults of the British Library Crime Classics discloses this decidedly nonclassic story of gangsters, espionage, and murder most frequent in 1940 London. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >