Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 5)

BLONDE ICE by R.G. Belsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"If you can overlook the comic-strip prose and by-the-numbers plotting, the hero is appealingly fallible—he's still carrying a torch for his ex, and he spends a fair amount of time temporizing and procrastinating—and there are some effective twists toward the end."
Daily News reporter Gil Malloy's third outing pits him against a serial killer who's also a member of the fairer sex. Read full book review >
IQ by Joe Ide
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"The present day, with its high-strung social media and emotional overload, could use a contemporary hero like Ide's, more inclined to use his brain than his mouth (or fists) to vanquish evil and subdue dread."
Sherlock Holmes comes to South Central Los Angeles. Only he's black, never finished high school, and can't seem to hold on to a regular job. Read full book review >

THE TWELVE DOGS OF CHRISTMAS by David Rosenfelt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Though the falling action never rises to the level of the setup, Rosenfelt's canine-loving hero is always good company—especially when he deals with someone who's gone to the dogs even more completely than him."
Rosenfelt, who continues to write some of the best hooks in the genre, saddles attorney Andy Carpenter (Outfoxed, 2015, etc.) with a client who's got only six months to brighten her Paterson neighborhood—if a guilty verdict doesn't remove her from her home first. Read full book review >
A STUDY IN SCARLET WOMEN by Sherry Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"For fans of etiquette-flouting heroines who desire truth while being true to their desires—gastronomic, romantic, and cerebral."
What if the word's most famous (and eccentric) Victorian detective were a young gentlewoman in the midst of a scandal? Read full book review >
ANOTHER DAY, ANOTHER DALI  by Sandra Orchard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Orchard (A Fool and His Monet, 2016, etc.) creates a likable, enviable heroine who knows art inside out but seems a tad short on common sense."
An art expert takes on a case of theft, forgery, and loopy family dynamics. Read full book review >

SKIN AND BONE by Robin Blake
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Blake's meticulous research makes his latest account of crime and medicine in the mid-1700s (The Hidden Man, 2015, etc.) a pleasure to read even though mystery mavens will have no trouble unmasking the killer."
The discovery of a baby's body in a tanner's pit has the 18th-century English town of Preston in an uproar. Read full book review >
EGGNOG MURDER by Leslie Meier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Heavy on cream and light on plot, this trio is most likely to appeal to fans of eggnog and coastal Maine."
Three tales of mayhem-by-eggnog penned by Maine boosters Ross, Hollis, and Meier. Read full book review >
HOLD A SCORPION by Melodie Johnson Howe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Howe (City of Mirrors, 2013, etc.) sets her story in Tinseltown, but her characters lack the pop of classic Hollywood despite hints throughout at her ability to do more."
An aging actress turns amateur investigator after word gets out that she knows more than she's telling about the pedestrian victim of a car accident. Read full book review >
GRACE by Howard Owen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 2016

"Owen uses his reflective, self-destructive hero to illuminate both the racial problems of his hometown and the ongoing death of the newspaper he loves, even though it doesn't love him back."
Proof positive that despite the title of police reporter Willie Black's fifth appearance (The Bottom, 2015, etc.), things can indeed get worse for both the city of Richmond and its daily newspaper. Read full book review >
MURDER UNDERGROUND by Mavis Doriel Hay
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"How this band of halfwits will solve a murder will surprise, and perhaps amuse, readers of this reprint of Hay's 1934 classic."
An unpleasant spinster meets her end on the stairs of the Belsize Park Tube station. Read full book review >
THE GREAT IMPERSONATION by E. Phillips Oppenheim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Grandly scaled old-school espionage, with the principals dressing for dinner, sipping port as they plot the ruin of each other's nations, and their women importunate but unfailingly discreet. Genre buffs shouldn't miss it; fans who read it years ago will be surprised how well it holds up."
A welcome reprinting of a classic 1920 spy tale, the most celebrated of the 100-plus novels by Oppenheim (1866-1946). Read full book review >
THE INHERITANCE by Charles Finch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Finch impressively raises the stakes of this tale between tea settings, and his character development is top-notch."
In the 10th installment of this Victorian-era series, a Member of Parliament-turned-private detective gets the chance to solve a 30-year-old mystery that involves his boyhood friend. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >