Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 5)

DYING TO TELL by TJ O'Connor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2016

"The third outing for the Gumshoe Ghost is just as complicated as the last entry (Dying for the Past, 2015, etc.) and even slower-moving. But the dynamic between Tuck and Angel keeps up the interest."
Oliver Tucker may be dead, but he's still a heck of a homicide detective. Read full book review >
THE MASQUERADING MAGICIAN by Gigi Pandian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2016

"Though many of the same charming characters return from the series debut (The Accidental Alchemist, 2015), the plot this time is little more than an excuse to trot them out again. Pandian hints that the next installment will focus once more on her main characters, which is what she does best."
An alchemist doing research on a visiting magician suspects he may share her talent, though with less pure motives. Read full book review >

THE GUARDIAN STONES by Eric Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A fascinating look at a small town mired in the past and confronting the future—with a bombshell ending."
A remote Shropshire town is beset by wartime demons even more insidious than the Third Reich. Read full book review >
NOTHING BAD IS GOING TO HAPPEN by Kathleen Hale
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"While this sequel is not up to the standard set by its predecessor, it provides amusement enough. (Mystery. 14 & up)"
After discovering her best friend's killer in No One Else Can Have You, Kippy finds revenge is sweet—until she becomes the victim of revenge in another humorous mystery.Read full book review >
FORTY THIEVES by Thomas Perry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"It's still entertaining and suspenseful to watch Sid and Ronnie and Ed and Nicole hatch plots to protect themselves by eliminating the shadowy figures who've been calling the shots, but their alliance strains belief, and 40 thieves turn out to be too many even for a writer as gifted as Perry to bring to life."
Is Perry mellowing with age? Just as he took off the edge in his latest case for disappearance specialist Jane Whitefield (A String of Beads, 2014, etc.), he almost relaxes in this tale of a husband-and-wife detective duo pursuing a husband-and-wife pair of killers.Read full book review >

SHERLOCK HOLMES, THE MISSING YEARS by Vasudev Murthy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Shame on you, says Watson, if you don't like the heroes in their unaccustomed new roles. Readers who expect Holmes and Watson to act like Holmes and Watson may want to think twice before taking this particular plunge."
Yet another version of what the Great Detective was up to during the busiest period of his life: the three years when he was presumed dead. Read full book review >
NO GUN INTENDED by Zoe Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"What Annabelle would undoubtedly call a 'hard-boiled cozy' is unlikely to appeal much to fans of either, unless they're really stuck on Portland."
Burke continues her genre-bending saga of a movie-crazed malaprop who yearns to be a private eye. Read full book review >
THE GIRLS SHE LEFT BEHIND by Sarah Graves
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Although they're also set in Maine, Graves' Jacobia Tiptree and Ellie White cozies (A Bat in the Belfry, 2014, etc.) are a far cry from this tense and fast-paced tale of love gone horribly and fantastically wrong."
A case hits close to home both literally and figuratively for Maine deputy sheriff Lizzie Snow. Read full book review >
KINGDOM COME by Jane Jensen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Though a quick description of the premise might make this series kickoff from Jensen sound absurd, her writing style is consistently engrossing and enticing. Trust earned in this book should be repaid by the installments that follow."
A New York cop returns home to Amish country and a community that's politely determined to undermine her efforts to solve the murder of a young woman from outside their insular world. Read full book review >
SCANDALOUS BEHAVIOR by Stuart Woods
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"As Stone continues to bed top women, buy every piece of real estate in sight, and vanquish the competition with the wave of a hand, you can't help but be struck by his increasing resemblance to Donald Trump. Or is that suggestion grounds for a libel suit?"
In this moments-after sequel to Foreign Affairs (2015), Stone Barrington acquires an English country estate, a brand-new enemy, and a corpse on his front lawn.Read full book review >
BORN IN A BURIAL GOWN by Mike Craven
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Craven (Assume Nothing, Believe Nobody, Challenge Everything, 2015) provides everything you want in a British procedural: a dark world, a tangled case, a clear and logical solution, and a deeply flawed hero who's still well worth rooting for."
A Cumbrian police inspector back on the job under false colors tracks the killer of a woman who seems to have been flying under false colors for much of her life. Read full book review >
REMEMBER, REMEMBER by Lisa Cutts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Not so much a whodunit as a race between justice and mortality: overstuffed, fast-paced, glum, and mostly unsurprising. Just the thing for fans of British procedurals who wish they could still watch Prime Suspect on the telly."
Back at the Riverstone police station after a stabbing almost cut short her career for good (Never Forget, 2013), DC Nina Foster lands a cold case with some red-hot tentacles.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >