Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 945)

ORIGINAL SIN by P.D. James
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 7, 1995

"One of James's most successful meldings of the old-fashioned whodunit onto the novel of character—a Middlemarch of the classic detective story."
The directors of London's venerable Peverell Press think that the suicide of senior editor Sonia Clements in the archive room of the firm's palatial offices in Innocent House is the last and most shocking episode in a series of disruptions to their business: some lost illustrations, a manuscript maliciously altered in proof, an unsigned note to one of the current authors pointing out that two other Peverell authors have recently died. Read full book review >
THE MAN WHO CANCELLED HIMSELF by David Handler
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 7, 1995

"Even so, Handler's easy mastery of sitcom cant and sitcom madness will keep you reading long after you've given up on the conscientious, forgettable plot."
TV comic Lyle Hudnut is in such deep doo-doo—he's been caught in a Vice sweep of a New York adult cinema—that he needs the best ghostwriter on earth to write his comeback autobiography. Read full book review >

MISSING by Jonathan Valin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"An unforgettable gallery of human monsters with human faces, presented by the legitimate heir to Ross Macdonald."
Mason Greenleaf, Cindy Dorn's bisexual lover, isn't just missing; within a week of taking the assignment to look for him, Harry Stoner finds that he's dead, an apparent pills-and-booze suicide after a tense confrontation with two unidentified strangers in a local gay bar. Read full book review >
TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY by Stuart M. Kaminsky
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Together with Hard Currency (see above), this tale provides dramatic evidence of Kaminsky's versatility—and a bright spot in the spottiest of his three detective series."
``I like my jobs straight and simple,'' laments Hollywood shamus Toby Peters (The Devil Met a Lady, 1994, etc.) shortly after getting sucked into still another case that is, as usual, anything but. Read full book review >
ANY GIVEN MOMENT by Laura Van Wormer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"A novel about warm agents who care and their loyal, altruistic authors: Shelve this as science fiction."
There's buoyant fun in Van Wormer's (Benedict Canyon, 1992, etc.) shrewd look at the publishing industry in which—after much splashing around—the little fish manages to swallow the big fish. Read full book review >

HARD CURRENCY by Stuart M. Kaminsky
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Though the two stories of Rostnikov abroad and his deputies back home never do come together, either one would be worth a book of its own in this richly rewarding series."
With the collapse of the evil Soviet empire, where can an ethical Russian cop like Inspector Porfiry Rostnikov (Death of a Russian Priest, 1992, etc.) find moral tussles within the system? Read full book review >
THE GANJA COAST by Paul Mann
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Cleverly plotted—the drug scam at the heart of the mystery is both ingenious and chilling—and as overripe as its setting and genre demand."
More Indian intrigue—drugs, politics, and an illicit land grab—for Bombay lawyer George Sansi (Season of the Monsoon, 1993). Read full book review >
DEKOK AND THE BROTHERS OF THE EASY DEATH by
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

An apparent husband-and-wife suicide—they are fished out of an Amsterdam canal with their fingers tightly linked—marks the beginning of another strange case for Inspector DeKok (Murder in Amsterdam, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
A PEDIGREE TO DIE FOR by Laurien Berenson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Less besotted than Susan Conant's show-dog tales, though the target audience is still clearly dogs and their favorite people."
Seven poodles were in attendance when Melanie Travis's Uncle Max died in his kennel. Read full book review >
CRANKS AND SHADOWS by K.C. Constantine
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"No mystery, but a memorable curtain call for its lovable hero: Balzic's Last Bow, spun out of a seamless skein of irresistible conversations."
Time was when series detectives just faded away, usually because their creators had died. Read full book review >
LEAVE THE GRAVE GREEN by Deborah Crombie
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"This isn't a detective novel, for heaven's sake,'' it's as tidily plotted and neatly written as the genuine article."
Twenty years after their son, Matthew, drowned in an accident near their home, noted opera conductor Sir Gerald Asherton and his wife, Dame Caroline Stowe, who retired from the opera stage after Matty's death, have an eerily similar tragedy to face: The body of their daughter Julia's estranged husband, Connor Swann, of whom they've remained inexplicably fond, has tumbled from the Hambledon Lock. Read full book review >
TURTLE BABY by Abigail Padgett
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"But she's still hands down the most original detective to set up shop in the past ten years."
Bo Bradley is on new meds for her manic-depression, but she still feels as if her job with San Diego's Child Protective Services involves moving mountains and jousting with windmills. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >