Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 945)

MAZATLAN by E. Howard Hunt
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 10, 1993

"No doubt they will, since Hunt gives his readership the sort of leathery fare they presumably want: For would-be tough guys only, though."
Another awesomely un-politically correct thriller from Hunt (Chinese Red, 1992, etc.), this kicking off a new series narrated by an ex-DEA agent who knows his way around guns, booze, and boats- -and who will slap a ``bitch'' around if she gets out of line. Read full book review >
RECYCLED by Jo Bailey
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 9, 1993

"Not much suspense, tension, or, for that matter, crunchy writing: a sub-par hospital thriller."
Jan Gallagher, who sued ``General Jack'' hospital for sex discrimination (Bagged, 1991) and won but was shunted off to a do- nothing security job there, is now assigned as staff liaison with DEA agent George Windish, a bossy incompetent, who's determined to keep alive Carmen Romero-Muehlen, a federal witness against her major drug cohorts, while she awaits a liver transplant. Read full book review >

THE MAN WHO INVENTED FLORIDA by Randy Wayne White
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 8, 1993

"Thoroughly antic, brazenly over the top."
By the time Agent Angela Walker calls on Marion ``Doc'' Ford (Sanibel Flats, 1990; The Heat Islands, 1991) to ask about his irascible uncle Tucker Gatrell—who has a long history of violence, instability, and orneriness—three men have already vanished in nearby Everglades National Park. Read full book review >
STAGE FRIGHT by Gillian Linscott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 1993

"Despite its shortcomings: the lively, well-done historical background and an energetic Nell make this outing adroitly entertaining."
Edwardian London's Nell Bray (Hanging on the Wire, etc.) is friendly with writer George Bernard Shaw, who is to open a new play (with feminist leanings) at the tiny Crispin theater. Read full book review >
DEATH OF A TRAVELLING MAN by M.C. Beaton
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 7, 1993

"Unpretentious fun for all."
Sergeant Hamish MacBeth, until now the entire police force in the Scottish village of Lubdoch (Death of a Glutton, etc.), is feeling beleaguered. Read full book review >

VINTAGE POLO by Jerry Kennealy
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 6, 1993

"Kennealy's developed a quiet mastery of every aspect of the private- eye novel except the mystery."
Wheelchair-bound Sonoma vintner Angelo Baroni, Sr., doesn't take it lightly when somebody salts a vat of his prize chardonnay and takes a shot at his son Angelo, Jr.: he hires Nick Polo (Special Delivery, 1992, etc.) to investigate—and just in time, too, since a few hours later an explosion rocks his new sparkling-wine plant. Read full book review >
MURDER AMONG US by Ann Granger
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 6, 1993

"143, etc.)."
The citizens of Inspector Alan Markby's bailiwick—Bamford, in the Cotswolds—have mixed feelings about the opening of historic, totally refurbished Springwood Hall as an upscale country hotel, owned by Swiss ex-hockey star Eric Schuhmacher. Read full book review >
HOPE WILL ANSWER by Susan B. Kelly
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 2, 1993

"Not much spark here: Nick and Alison are nice enough, if a tad dull—but as before, their ever-so-civilized conversation and mundane insights make for only mildly diverting fare."
Newly elevated to the rank of Detective Chief Inspector, Hopbridge CID, Nick Trevellyan (Time of Hope, etc.) must now find the village rapist who targets youngsters the age of Girl Guides, and he must do so with an ambitious new partner, Sheila Walpoke, while his usual sergeant is in hospital and his lady-love, computer-whiz Alison Hope, is off in London trying to find the hacker who's menacing her pal Philip's computer firm. Read full book review >
DEAD MAN by Joe Gores
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Together with Gores's sublimely comic, and utterly different, 32 Cadillacs (1992): a towering pair of back-to-back home runs."
Eddie Dain's career as a lighthearted player of games from chess to computer research and private investigations ends the night two goons—hired by somebody unhappy about the way Dain's been sniffing around a conveniently accidental death—kill his wife and child and leave him for dead. Read full book review >
THE SNARES OF DEATH by Kate Charles
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Wildly improbable character motivation, but vintage village mystery buffs will adore the prissy parish spinsters, the long- suffering vicar's wife and the fortuitously dropped bits of gossip that fuel the sluggish plot."
For two-thirds of the book, obnoxious Evangelical minister Bob Dexter antagonizes his wife, daughter, new parishioners, animal- rights activists, and millionaire Noah Gates of the Gates of Heaven Printing Company, and then, finally, someone picks up part of an altar rail and dispatches him. Read full book review >
HEAD LOCK by Jerome Doolittle
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Expect a rebuttal from Dan Quayle."
At the rate he's going, Tom Bethany, Boston's foremost Spenser imitator, will soon be out of the mystery business altogether. Read full book review >
THE SKELETON'S KNEE by Archer Mayor
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Mayor, who could probably write dandy investigative nonfiction, needs to tighten up his storylines before this otherwise estimable series sinks into mediocrity."
When Vermont recluse Abraham Fuller dies, the autopsy reveals he was killed by an aneurysm—caused by a bullet shot at him about 20 years before. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >