Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 945)

THE ANGEL MAKER by Ridley Pearson
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 9, 1993

"Band-Aids emit low-level radioactivity from being sterilized): a top-flight offering from an author who's clearly found his groove."
Potent blend of medical thriller and police procedural that resurrects the cop-hero of Pearson's Undercurrents (1988) and pits him against—of all things—a maniacal veterinarian. Read full book review >
THE MAKEOVER MURDERS by Jennifer Rowe
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 6, 1993

"A pleasant diversion, nonetheless, for cozy fans."
It's a dark and stormy night when Verity (``Birdie'') Read full book review >

MARY, MARY by Ed McBain
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 6, 1993

"Terrific courtroom patter, but by case's end most readers will declare a mistrial."
Did retired schoolteacher Mary Barton go on a three-day killing spree, murdering and mutilating three young girls and then burying them in her garden in the dead of night? Read full book review >
HARD WOMEN by Barbara D’Amato
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 2, 1993

"Nothing new or enlightening here, and the best dialogue—most of it cribbed from Shakespeare—comes from the mouth of Cat's pet parrot Long John."
In this fourth adventure—a letdown after last year's smartly worked-out Hard Luck—Chicago freelancer Cat Marsala is putting together a TV documentary on prostitution and, in the process, offering her teeny apartment as a temporary haven for high-priced call-girl Sandra Love. Read full book review >
THE MUSIC LOVERS by Jonathan Valin
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

"After the concentrated tension of Extenuating Circumstances and Second Chance, this is almost a holiday for Harry—but it's carried off with all Valin's customary professionalism."
Hired to investigate the theft of audiophile Leon Tubin's treasured LPs—really to pin it on rival collector Sherwood Loeffler- -Harry Stoner runs into a rash of felonies: the thief returns twice more (attacking Harry when he's caught in the act) before a final confrontation leaves Leon badly beaten and his longtime lover, rock singer Sheila Mozkowski, kidnapped. Read full book review >

ENDANGERED SPECIES by Rex Burns
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

"A standout entry in this normally quiet series."
The ninth case for Gabe Wager (Homicide, Denver P.D.; Body Guard, etc.) is actually two cases: the shooting of Tapat°os gang member Ray Moralez, and the death of a badly charred corpse in a house whose vanished tenant's paper trail is a dead end. Read full book review >
THE WAY THROUGH THE WOODS by Colin Dexter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

"Bolt the door and enjoy."
Vacationing Chief Inspector Morse's eye is caught by a Times story about an anonymous poem evidently referring to the year-old disappearance of Swedish student Karin Eriksson. Read full book review >
PUSSYFOOT by Carole Nelson Douglas
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

"Dog lovers, and lovers of well-made plots and prose, need not apply."
Principled p.r. freelancer Temple Barr (Catnap, 1992) gets backed into arranging publicity for the Goliath Hotel's stripper competition- -thanks to the heart-attack that sleazy columnist Crawford Buchanan suffered when he discovered the body of one of the contestants hanging by her own G-string. Read full book review >
THE RICH DETECTIVE by H.R.F. Keating
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

"All the dry-eyed penetration of an English Simenon, coupled with Keating's usual sly humor: a treat not to be missed."
Keating's last Inspector Ghote novel (The Iciest Sin) focused on the ethics of detection; this ironic tale goes still further in exploring the obsession of Detective Inspector Bill Sylvester, who investigates an anonymous tip that polished antiques-dealer Charles Roanoke has killed three nursing-home residents for the money he's inveigled them into leaving him. Read full book review >
FARRIER'S LANE by Anne Perry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"The same mixture, then, but suffering an attack of bloat."
In this 13th outing for Victorian-era Police Inspector Thomas Pitt and his well-born wife Charlotte (Belgrave Square, etc.), it's Gracie, the Pitt maid of all work, who uncovers the most telling and dramatic clue. Read full book review >
DON'T ASK by Donald E. Westlake
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

"Westlake's compilation of very funny slapstick vignettes—Ö la a series of Saturday Night Live sketches—can wear a bit thin as a novel, but they're a most effective antidepressant."
The hapless Dortmunder and his gang (Drowned Hopes, 1990, etc.) are hired to burgle the emerging nation of Votskojek's US embassy, ensconced in a boat on the East River, to redeem a sacred relic—the thighbone of the cannibalized 13th-century saint Ferghana—and bring it to the emerging nation of Tsergovia's embassy, a lower Second Avenue storefront, thus insuring the latter's induction into the UN. Read full book review >
EYE FOR AN EYE by Erika Holzer
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

"Moderately involving, with an intriguing heroine; but far- fetched, slow-paced, preachy, and confused about its moral stance: for all its manipulations, the Rosenberg remains a more exciting- -and honest—read."
On the heels of Nancy Taylor Rosenberg's Mitigating Circumstances (1992) comes this second thriller about a female vigilante. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >