Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 948)

THE BLACK ENVELOPE by Norman Manea
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1995

"Nothing new, but the telling is handled in such a preposterously slippery way that it frequently seems so."
With prose that's alternately tough and tender (Dashiell Hammett meets Rilke), as well as downright wacky, Romanian ÇmigrÇ Manea (Compulsory Happiness, 1993, etc.) offers another of his dense and often caustic views of modern eastern Europe. Read full book review >
DEATH AND JUDGMENT by Donna Leon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1995

"The first of Leon's books to knit together all her strengths: endearing detective, jaundiced social pathology, and a paranoid eye for plotting on a grand scale."
A grim prologue sets the tone for Venetian Commissario Guido Brunetti's fourth case (Dressed for Death, 1994, etc.)—even though it takes quite a while to hook up the spectacularly fatal truck crash that opens the novel to the relatively quiet shooting, aboard a Venice-bound train, of former city Counsellor Carlo Trevisan. Read full book review >

SLEEK BODIES by Mark Daniel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 31, 1995

"But like his convoluted, exhaustively detailed plot, he's carrying too much weight for the distance here."
Ever since he was caught out in a racing scam that wrecked his marriage and humbled his family, Philip Glaister has been licking his wounds in the south of France, minding his own business and occasionally providing the likes of wealthy, noble rotter Richard Heron and his wife, Philip's childhood friend Eledi Heron, with sportive young women. Read full book review >
WHO IN HELL IS WANDA FUCA by G.M. Ford
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 26, 1995

"First-novelist Ford does less well, though, treating all his characters—including the allegedly unforgettable spitfire Caroline—as so many faceless floaters."
It's not a who, it's where—the Strait of Juan de Fuca in Seattle—and its patron saint is raffish shamus Leo Waterman, whose politico father used to hang with the likes of aging mobster Tim Flood. Read full book review >
MURDER IN THE EXECUTIVE MANSION by Elliott Roosevelt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 25, 1995

"With a puzzle a bit more complex than most in the series, this offers low-key, affable entertainment."
Back to the pre-WW II White House of 1939, as President Franklin Roosevelt and wife Eleanor prepare for a state visit from England's King and Queen. Read full book review >

THE STOLEN CHILD by Paul Cody
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 25, 1995

"A raw, moving tale—and a parents' chiller."
A first-novelist's biting, pitiless penetration of a nightmare: the 1963 abduction, drugging, and mental crippling of a nine-year-old boy as seen through the eyes of a variety of witnesses and those it touches—and has touched—indirectly over three decades. Read full book review >
HOSTILE WITNESS by William Lashner
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 24, 1995

"Grisham fans will love the lawyer-baiting and righteous self-disgust, which will evidently continue indefinitely in a promised series. (First printing of 75,000; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Debut thriller about a Philadelphia lawyer tired of being behind on his charge cards who agrees to join the defense team for an embattled city councilman and his aide—and then watches his slick new buddies sell him down the river. Read full book review >
KILL OR CURE by Mary Kittredge
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 23, 1995

"But readers who can overlook heavy coincidence and lightweight motivation will have a gripping good time with this one."
A fast-moving, high-tension sixth adventure for New Haven's Edwina Crusoe (Desperate Remedy, 1993, etc.)—nurse, heiress, and mother of two-year-old twins—whose one-woman agency investigates medically related cases. Read full book review >
FENCE JUMPERS by Robert Leuci
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 22, 1995

"Steamclouds of entertainment and great cooking."
Leuci's best, a Mafia opera worthy of Verdi. Read full book review >
A FAMINE OF HORSES by P.F. Chisholm
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 19, 1995

"A briskly paced debut rich in spiky characters, eccentric accents, and, above all, a charismatic hero with a sense of honor and a sense of humor."
The first in a series by the pseudonymous Chishom, author of other historical fiction, paints a vivid picture of 16th-century life in northern England, on Scotland's border. Read full book review >
SLAUGHTER MUSIC by Russell James
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 19, 1995

"If they are, their family reunions must be worthy of those of the other James brothers, Jesse and Frank."
Whether or not he's related to Bill (Club, above), Russell James is equally a connoisseur of British lowlife. Read full book review >
BEYOND ICE, BEYOND DEATH by Thomas McCall
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 18, 1995

"Try finding that combination under any other rock in Chicago."
It's been a long fall from grace for NASA physicist Edward Boyes and his lover, Russian programmer Irina Varonyev, since they collaborated on the Phobos I project that sent two defective space probes to investigate the moons of Mars. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >