Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 948)

MURDER IN MELLINGHAM by Susan Oleksiw
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"For those who care."
Genteel, bullying Beth O'Donnell, on another uninvited visit to her brother and sister-in-law, leaves their party for their guest cottage and promptly gets killed—causing scarcely a ripple on the Mellingham, Massachusetts, social surface. Read full book review >
KILL THE BUTLER! by Michael Kenyon
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"He should apply for a patent."
When rich old Lou Langley is killed in a suspicious accident on his Long Island estate, Chief Rosko of the Dunehampton police, eager to prove he's doing everything he can, gets the bright idea of planting an English detective in the household as a butler—and the job naturally falls to Henry Peckover, the poet of Scotland Yard (Peckover Holds the Baby, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >

THE CLEVELAND CONNECTION by Les Roberts
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"Editorial pruning would have helped, particularly with the repetitiveness, but, still, a good—and timely—Yugoslav cultural primer."
Milan Jacovich, the Cleveland p.i. of Slovene heritage (Deep Shaker, etc.), in trying to locate a missing grandfather of Serbian extraction, must sort through age-old Balkan animosities—as well as modern-era wise-guy rules of conduct. Read full book review >
THE NEXT VICTIM by William Sanders
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"Not many surprises in this hardcover debut, but Tag talks a nice case, and manages to make fun of most of the medium-boiled clichÇs he strolls through."
When her prostitute mother Lorene is found murdered, Amy Matson comes home from college to Tulsa and asks freelance writer Taggart Roper, who sometimes takes on odd jobs, to find out just what Lorene meant by the ``insurance policy'' that would keep money coming in if anything happened to her. Read full book review >
A SUDDEN DEATH AT THE NORFOLK CAFE by Winona Sullivan
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"But first-novelist Sullivan—1991 winner of the publisher's Best First Private Eye Novel Contest—delivers the goods with a smartly paced, alternately sweet and tough story that has all the moves of a gangbusting nun."
Jane Hersey—18, pregnant, and spurned by sleazy Martin Moon, the happy father—gets her own back by stealing his blackmail file (including an incriminating letter written by her own father, a Congressional candidate) and running to Boston's Convent of Our Lady of Good Counsel, ``the only order in America to have a stockbroker.'' There, she's taken under the wing of Sister Cecile—heiress, nun, and licensed p.i. Read full book review >

MOTOWN UNDERGROUND by Doug Allyn
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"A typical carnage caper—heavy on sex, ammo, showdowns, and car chases."
Grisly second outing for Detroit cop Lupe Garcia (The Cheerio Killings, 1989), who now has to weather a gang-generated explosion, then turn down a request from a friend—cancer-riddled ex-cop Danny Kelly—to kill Danny's brutal partner in the rock club Underground. Read full book review >
A DEATH FOR A DODO by E.X. Giroux
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"A downer for this usually satisfying author."
Barrister-sleuth Robert Forsythe, sans faithful secretary Abigail Sanderson (A Death for a Dancing Doll, 1991, etc.), is recuperating from knee surgery in the lush Damien Day rest home—a hospital for the sick, addicted, or obese rich enough to afford it. Read full book review >
LIEBERMAN'S CHOICE by Stuart M. Kaminsky
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"The incongruous mix of taut narrative and shaggy domestic detail keeps this below the level of Lieberman's debut (Lieberman's Folly, 1991), but it's still well worth your time."
Mad as hell and resolved not to take any more, Chicago cop Bernie Shepard shoots his wife and her lover, then adjourns to the roof of his apartment building, which he's already wired with explosives, and demands that the police send up the man who first seduced and corrupted his spouse—Captain Alan Kearney, now assigned to the task force trying to get Shepard down. Read full book review >
SHOT ON LOCATION by Stan Cutler
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 18, 1993

"The guy needs a good coauthor."
When the son of Oscar-winning Stacy Jaeger, a giant (300 lb.) figure in American acting, confesses to shooting his sister's abusive lover, Cutler's twosome—redneck Hollywood p.i. Read full book review >
HARD EVIDENCE by John T. Lescroart
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 18, 1993

"But Lescroart's laid-back, soft-shoe approach to legal intrigue is all his own. (First printing of 50,000)"
The shaggy lawyer/bartender of The Vig (1991) tries his hand at blockbuster courtroom drama—in an engaging crossover novel written with both eyes firmly on Scott Turow. Read full book review >
THE NEW MYSTERY by Jerome Charyn
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 16, 1993

"Though it doesn't live up to the promise of its title, this is still the best one-volume bundle of mystery stories around."
A generously defined (unfashionably so) anthology of mystery stories, over a third of them (16 of 42) new. Read full book review >
FULL COMMISSION by Carol Brennan
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 15, 1993

"An undemanding, amiable read, though amateur sleuth Wareham is a tad more naive than one would expect from a twice-divorced, 40- ish, Upper Westside New Yorker."
When New York p.r. hotshot Liz Wareham (Headhunt, 1991) stops her cab to defend a little old lady, Ada Fauer, from hired muscle Jerry Zeibach, she finds herself smack in the middle of a tenant- landlord brouhaha: Ada's building is part of self-made millionaire Alfred Stover's plans for his upscale Westover development, and the current residents are being frozen out—and worse. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >