Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 948)

BOX NINE by Jack O'Connell
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Strong stuff, all right: O'Connell gets so deep inside his small- town cast that it's a relief to turn the last page."
The winner of Mysterious Press's first ``Mysterious Discovery'' contest introduces Lt. Read full book review >
THE LYNCHING by Bennie Lee Sinclair
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"An accomplished debut."
Justyn Jones, an aide to Governor Marston of South Carolina, and Thomas Levity, a handsome black teacher from California, are seatmates on a plane to the town of Green Hills, where Justyn lives with realtor husband Frank. Read full book review >

SHADOW QUEEN by Tony Gibbs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Very charming, very witty, totally absurd, and thoroughly beguiling."
Sailing specialist Gibbs (Dead Run, 1988; Running Fix, 1990) goes on shore leave to spin a wildly romantic yarn about a Princess Diana look-alike called upon to protect the rightful Queen of Scots from the perils of present-day New York. Read full book review >
THE GREEN PROGRESSION by Jr. Modesitt
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"The truly ingenious plot and the clever effort to put bureaucratic Washington under harsh light are largely undone by a Consumer Reports writing style."
Consultants to a Washington law firm take on the Soviets who plan to sap America's military strength through the encouragement of excessive environmentalism—a first collaboration from Modesitt (The Magic of Recluce, p. 510) and newcomer Levinson, an environmental consultant. Read full book review >
DEATH AND THE CHAPMAN by Kate Sedley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"A strong debut."
A septuagenarian recalls his youth, when, in 1471, he quit the Benedictines (no calling), became a chapman (a wandering peddler), and discovered his affinity for detective work. Read full book review >

SHEEP, GOATS AND SOAP by John Malcolm
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Disappointing—especially after the author's polished last outing (The Wrong Impression, 1990)."
Eighth in the series featuring art-expert/sleuth Tim Simpson, one of a three-man team that invests in art for White's Bank of London. Read full book review >
TO DIE FOR by Joyce Maynard
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"A more penetrating writer could have a field day analyzing recent popular fiction's disavowal of the tawdry culture that continues to grip it as tightly as Suzanne holds Jimmy."
Perky, aspiring newscaster Suzanne Maretto persuades her teenaged lover and his buddy to kill her straight-arrow husband; just deserts follow for all. Read full book review >
THE FACE ON THE CUTTING ROOM FLOOR by Stan Cutler
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 30, 1991

"Better just unreel and enjoy Mark and Ray's endless, though oddly similar, supply of one-liners."
Pepper-and-salt detective duo Rayford Goodman (right-thinking, 50-ish, worried about angina) and Mark Bradley (left-thinking, blow- dried, gay), linked only by mutual aversion and Rayford's unlikely romance with Mark's researcher friend Francie, are back for another Hollywood shoot-'em-up, commencing with the execution of director Claudio Fortunata as he's recovering from plastic surgery (a flawless killing except that it's not Fortunata under the bandages). Read full book review >
HUBBERT AND LIL by Gallagher Gray
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 29, 1991

"First in what has the look of being a stilted, amateurish series."
The forced-humor debut of T.S. Hubbert, a newly retired personnel director, and his octogenarian, quaintly bizarre Auntie Lil—the two of whom, archly analyzing the clues, unravel the murders connected with the stodgy, genteelly posh private bank Sterling & Sterling. Read full book review >
BAD BLOOD by P.M. Carlson
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 24, 1991

"Another strong entry in the Perfect Crime series."
When Rina Marshall's daughter, Ginny, suddenly disappears and a guest at her mother Leonora's bridge party, the very charming John Spencer, is found dead near the school library with Ginny's scissors skewering him, everyone is eager to find the teenager. Read full book review >
HOME TO ROOST by Gerald Hammond
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 23, 1991

"362) has done much, much better."
Keith Calder, the author's gun-expert/sleuth, has a small but crucial role in this balky adventure. Read full book review >
ROOK-SHOOT by Margaret Duffy
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 20, 1991

"A nice return to jangling form after the rather tiresome Cock Robin."
Now that Falklands hero Major Patrick Gillard has been forced to resign from D-12, the supersecret section of British Intelligence (Who Killed Cock Robin?, 1990), and his novelist wife (also a D-12 member) has finished her manuscript, they're planning a third honeymoon—when Patrick's brother Larry, a schoolmaster overseeing an Outward Bound-like program, asks for help: someone has been sabotaging his outings. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >