Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 955)

MUCHO MOJO by Joe R. Lansdale
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A hybrid between a thriller and a comedy of manners that is imaginative and chilling. (Author tour)"
A raunchy tale of perversion and murder with a distinctly East Texan twist. Read full book review >
SAND BLIND by Julian Rathbone
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Despite the sometimes herky-jerky nature of the plot, the political minuets are danced superbly—they're what you read the book for, and they make you think."
The newest political thriller from a seasoned writer of the genre is almost there: intelligent, challenging, complex—but never quite believable. Read full book review >

THE DOBIE PARADOX by Desmond Cory
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Columbo with a chair in mathematics."
Many fictional sleuths toil for years without seeing their names emblazoned on their books' titles, but it's oddly appropriate that Professor John Dobie, in only his third adventure, should lend his name to this new case. Read full book review >
WHERE OLD BONES LIE by Ann Granger
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"This latest in a series (Murder Among Us, 1993, etc.) has some nice twists, but alas, it moves with the speed of an archaeological excavation: painfully slow."
Ursula Gretton has two problems: She can't seem to convince her archaeology partner, Dan Woollard, that their affair is over, and she can't seem to locate Dan's wife, Natalie, who has disappeared. Read full book review >
COLUMBO by William Harrington
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Ice cold."
Peter Falk meets Charles Manson, right? Read full book review >

THE TOTAL ZONE by Martina Navratilova
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"First of a series that has a ways to go before it's ready for the Grand Slam."
In the five years since a stinging Wimbledon defeat sent her into retirement, physical therapist Jordan Myles has learned to turn a colder eye on the pro tennis tour. Read full book review >
CLOSE QUARTERS by Marissa Piesman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Solid writing from an author who ought to forget the mystery angle and just use her ironic gifts to go to town Ö la Nora Ephron. (Mystery Guild alternate selection)"
The good news is: Piesman (Heading Uptown, 1993, etc.) still has a great narrative voice for Nina Fischman's antics. Read full book review >
ELECTRIC CITY by K.K. Beck
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"No wonder Jane's foundation won't pay her off."
Why would inoffensive Irene March of the Columbia Clipping Service have gone AWOL just a few days after her triumphant TV stint on Jeopardy! left her $20,000 richer? Read full book review >
THE MANX MURDERS by William L. DeAndrea
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"If you're counting clues, you'll find this puzzle ingenious, fair (almost too fair—it's easier to solve than the average crossword), but also so thinly imagined, it's instantly forgettable."
It's hard to stay busy when you're a philosopher of evil whose theories are based exclusively on the face-to-face study of serial killers, so it's not surprising when Professor Niccolo Benedetti (The Werewolf Murder, 1992, etc.) intervenes in the feud between Clyde and Henry Pembroke, twin government contractors who can't agree to release specifications on a revolutionary new smokescrubber one of their employees has invented. Read full book review >
A FEW DYING WORDS by Paula Gosling
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"But the tired plot and luxurious detail eventually wear you out, like a nursing-home visit to a loquacious uncle."
Here's a major headache for Sheriff Matt Gabriel of Great Lakes summer-vacation paradise Blackwater (The Body in Blackwater Bay, 1992, etc.): His old friend Tom Finnegan gets into a fatal car crash—his dying words hint darkly about ``Jacky Morgan''—just in time for Blackwater's annual Halloween Festival, aka the Howl, a Great Lakes Mardi Gras when anything goes among the normally sane citizenry, from decorating public statuary to ambushing strollers in the park. Read full book review >
CRIMSON GREEN by Bruce Zimmerman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Even after Brad's killed, Peggy's punched out, Alison's snatched, and Quinn's threatened by serious Vegas gamblers, Quinn still has plenty of time to needle Kate Ulrich, who's returned to warm the cockles of his bed, about her old boyfriend, Craig."
How seriously should small-time golf hustler Brad Helfan take the threats to kill him and his family if he doesn't blow his improbable last-round lead in the US Open at Pebble Beach, Calif.? Read full book review >
TWELVE RED HERRINGS by Jeffrey Archer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 27, 1994

"The formidable storytelling skills apparent in Archer's novels are more cleverly concealed than the clues here. ($365,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
With this tiresome collection of stories planted with misleading clues, Archer (Honor Among Thieves, 1993, etc.) fails in his bid to be an O. Henry for the '90s. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >