Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 955)

DEATH IN DISGUISE by Caroline Graham
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 22, 1993

"Wonderfully funny, with such solid, traditional underpinnings as good plotting, judiciously dropped clues, and a luminescent turn of phrase: a likely-to-be New Age classic."
A third ramble through the village for Chief Inspector Barnaby and Sergeant Troy (Murder at Madingley Grange, 1991; Death of a Hollow Man, 1989) giddily blends homage and satire in the goings-on at the Manor House in Compton Dando, where a wacko bunch of spiritualists/charlatans/disciples have taken up residence. Read full book review >
BLOOD TRANCE by R.D. Zimmerman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 22, 1993

"The sustained note of hysteria keeps your blood pumping while preventing you from taking any of it seriously."
When she gets a letter from her agoraphobic former patient Loretta Long begging for help in ``a matter of life and death,'' blind, paraplegic hypnotist/psychologist Maddy Phillips (Death Trance, 1992) sends her brother Alex to Chicago to help Loretta. Read full book review >

FIRST WIFE, TWICE REMOVED by Clare Curzon
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 16, 1993

"Clever misdirection from the competent Curzon, whose Thames Valley coppers (Cat's Cradle, etc.) are always interesting if a shade too introspective."
The autopsy on Penny Winter shows that the poor, overworked young mother died from poisoned pÉtÇ—not from the fall down the stairs that followed. Read full book review >
DEATH ECHO by Kerry Tucker
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 16, 1993

"Messy complications—it's really a juicy secret—are hoarded until the very last minute; not even engaging Libby can overcome the resulting imbalance between leisurely sleuthing and suddenly torrential returns."
After a visit to her long-distance boyfriend Dan Sikora back in Ohio, photojournalist Libby Kincaid (Still Waters, Cold Feet) promises Dan's old girlfriend Pam Bates that she'll return to investigate her stepmother Lydia Butcher's sudden strange behavior—refusing to leave her house, spending hardly any of her money—in exchange for an exclusive interview with Lydia's reclusive, newly famous sister Mavis Skye Nihiser, 80-something author of homespun bestseller The Tree of Life. Read full book review >
MATERIAL WITNESS by Robert K. Tanenbaum
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 15, 1993

Even a slugger like Tanenbaum (Reversible Error, 1992, etc.) can't hit a home run every time—as witnessed by this contrived, though compelling, fifth novel in his 70's-set series about crime- busting Manhattan D.A. Butch Karp and his crew. Read full book review >

MIDNIGHT BABY by Wendy Hornsby
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 15, 1993

"Smartly written, vividly populated, mostly engrossing entertainment that could have been even better with a touch of restraint."
Photographer/documentary-filmmaker Maggie MacGowen (Telling Lies—not reviewed), divorced mother of teenaged daughter Casey, is caught up in the short life of 14-year-old Hillary Ramsdale, found murdered soon after Maggie met her—homeless, frightened, and known only as ``Pisces''—on the mean streets of Los Angeles. Read full book review >
YAKUZA, GO HOME! by Anne Wingate
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 15, 1993

"Despite its clumsy title: a solid police procedural much enhanced by its exotic characters."
Mark Shigata, the ethical, emotional, ex-FBI police chief of tiny Bayport, Texas, once again faces a hated foe—crime czar Buddy Yamagata. Read full book review >
SATAN'S LAMBS by Lynn S. Hightower
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 14, 1993

"For Hightower's first hardcover: Great talk, heavy action, and, in Lena, a gritty lady with a future."
The drive for this suspense grabber set in Kentucky, about the search for a child held by cult creeps, is supplied by the tough, jumpy, compassionate-to-hurting p.i. Read full book review >
SELENA by Gordon Randolph Willey
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 14, 1993

"A fine debut—all unhurried, forthright, companionable, and buttoned down."
By the time retired archeologist and longtime Bostonian 72- year-old Colin Edwards concludes a visit to his native St. Read full book review >
MISSING JOSEPH by Elizabeth George
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 14, 1993

"Still, fewer than usual over-the-top descriptive passages are a welcome relief."
What price motherhood? Read full book review >
CLIFF HANGER by Philip R. Craig
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 11, 1993

"Craig's writing improves the farther off-island he ventures, but no matter how lyrical his descriptions of the Rockies and how self-deprecatingly manly his hero, it still can't offset a thin plot—and far too many fish recipes."
When ex-Boston cop and current Martha's Vineyard fisherman Jeff ``J.W.'' Jackson (The Double-Minded Men, etc.) beats up Lloyd Cramer after Lloyd beat up his girlfriend Geraldine, everyone, including J.W., thinks it's Lloyd who makes three attempts on his life—until J.W. realizes someone is mistaking him for Weststock College professor John Skye and wants him dead for allegedly leading on and then abandoning student Bernie Orwell, causing her to commit suicide. Read full book review >
LIAR'S POKER by Frank McConnell
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 11, 1993

"Time for Harry to clean up his act."
A barely coherent new case for Chicago's warmhearted, foulmouthed p.i. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >